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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: April ::
Qs: Shows; John; R3; Oth; Bear; Line; Youth
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0285.  Tuesday, 11 April 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Roger D. Gross <
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        Date:   Monday, 10 Apr 1995 10:39:10 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   London theatre
 
(2)     From:   Alexander D. Smith <
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        Date:   Monday, 10 Apr 1995 12:28:19 -0500
        Subj:   Don John has an incy-weency part
 
(3)     From:   John Ammerman <
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        Date:   Monday, 10 Apr 1995 12:14:13 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Richard III's Sexuality
 
(4)     From:   Deanna Gregg <
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        Date:   Monday, 10 Apr 1995 15:48:12 -0800
        Subj:   SHK 6.0275  Qs: Hypertext and CDs
 
(5)     From:   Colin  Campbell <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 11 Apr 1995 01:43:12 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   TN and bear-baiting
 
(6)     From:   Anna Cole <
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        Date:   Monday, 10 Apr 1995 12:17:33 GMT
        Subj:   Macbeth Act3 Sc4
 
(7)     From:   Richard J Kennedy <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 11 Apr 1995 07:53:36 -0700
        Subj:   the fair youth
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger D. Gross <
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Date:           Monday, 10 Apr 1995 10:39:10 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        London theatre
 
I'll be in London for the "Within This Wooden O" conference from 4/15 -4/20 and
I'd like to see some good theatre.  Since there is always more good theatre in
London than one can possibly see, I will appreciate any advice SHAKSPEReans can
give me on which shows are not to be missed.
 
Thanks for your help.
 
Roger Gross
Univ. of Arkansas
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alexander D. Smith <
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Date:           Monday, 10 Apr 1995 12:28:19 -0500
Subject:        Don John has an incy-weency part
 
We are doing Much Aabout Nothing here at Northwestern and I have just
again realized how small Don John's (the bastard brother of Don Pedro) part
is.  He's on for only about three scenes and then flees Messina not to
return for the rest of the play.  Yhe one thing that struck me about reading
this is that it doesn't seem right.  It almost seems like Shakepeare just
wanted to get Don John the hell out of the play so that he could work on all
of the confusion and screwy love that was going on.  All Don John is is a
catalyst to start the confusion and through everything into disorder and
then he falls out of the picture.  Iago was caught and brought back at the
end of Othello to explain why he did what he did.  We hear that Don John is
brought back by armed guards in the next to last line of the play, but he is
never questioned.  Did Shakespeare just give up writing this part?  Did he
worry that this would make the play too dark? And why did Don John make Hero
be seen as a whore?  Just to hurt his brother Don pedro?  What is his
motivation for doing this, are all bastard brothers assumed to want to kill
their natural brother?
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Ammerman <
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Date:           Monday, 10 Apr 1995 12:14:13 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Richard III's Sexuality
 
I am working on a thesis on the externalization of Richard's sublimated
sexuality, seen in the landscape (ie, Tower of London as phallic symbol), and
women, (ie, marginalization of women to point of merely embittered observer).
 
Longer replys may be made to me directly 
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Thanks from Phil at The Evergreen State College
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Deanna Gregg <
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Date:           Monday, 10 Apr 1995 15:48:12 -0800
Subject: Qs: Hypertext and CDs
Comment:        SHK 6.0275  Qs: Hypertext and CDs
 
Does anyone know about a CD-ROM presentation of "Othello?"  Thanking you.
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Colin  Campbell <
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Date:           Tuesday, 11 Apr 1995 01:43:12 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        TN and bear-baiting
 
I have a question for you SHAKSPERians. I'm working on a production of Twelfth
Night in which I'm examining the `gulling' of Malvolio through the lense or
metaphor of bear-baiting (Malvolio being the bear, Feste the dog, and Sir Toby,
Sir Andrew and Maria the gamblers). Unfortunately I'm having a hard time
finding leads on the practice of bear-baiting in Elizabethan London. Any ideas?
Wasn't the Swan originally a bear-baiting pit?
 
Thanks so much for any references,
Colin Campbell
 
(6)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anna Cole <
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Date:           Monday, 10 Apr 1995 12:17:33 GMT
Subject:        Macbeth Act3 Sc4
 
I would be very grateful for help in understanding precisely what is meant by a
particular line of Macbeth's.  It occurs in Act 3.iv, after Macbeth enquires of
Lady Macbeth: "How sayst thou that Macduff denies his person/At our great
bidding?" To which she replies: "Did you send to him, sir?" Then he says: "I
hear it by the way, but I will send." The speech continues but this is a
complete sentence and I am unable to make sense of it.  With such an excellence
of Shakespeareans (surely there is no better collective noun!), I feel
confident enough to give my sincere thanks in advance.
 
Anna Cole
 
(7)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard J Kennedy <
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Date:           Tuesday, 11 Apr 1995 07:53:36 -0700
Subject:        the fair youth
 
Was Shakespeare gay?  If the first 17 sonnets are written to a man, you'd
certainly think so.  Pluck a handful out and read them to someone innocent of
Shakespeare, and ask, "are these poems written to a man or to a woman?"  If the
first 17 are to a man, then Shakespeare was writing romantic poetry to some
other guy.  If to a woman, they might almost be taken as a proposal of
marriage.
 
The first 17 sonnets are generally taken to be written to Henry Wriothesley,
3rd Earl of Southampton.  It seems to me that if this is the right
identification, there was some homoerotic interest between the two men.  Can
anyone help this out?
 

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