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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: April ::
Re: Burial Customs; Sh. & Co., etc.; Spanish Tragedy
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0286.  Tuesday, 11 April 1995.
 
(1)     From:   John E. Perry <JPERRY@CEBAFVAX.BITNET>
        Date:   Monday, 10 Apr 1995 14:38:07 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Burial customs
 
(2)     From:   Christine Mack Gordon <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 11 Apr 95 09:48:11 -0500
        Subj:   Shakespeare & Co, subjectivity, etc.
 
(3)     From:   Ed Gieskes <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 11 Apr 1995 09:33:06 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   The Spanish Tragedy
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John E. Perry <JPERRY@CEBAFVAX.BITNET>
Date:           Monday, 10 Apr 1995 14:38:07 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Burial customs
 
To Gloria R. Wilson and others:
 
It is still the custom in rural southern Italy that ordinary people are buried
temporarily. There is simply no room for permanent graves for everyone. My
wife's aunt was dug up last year after spending ten years in her grave and
moved to a family vault (her family is quite wealthy for southern Italy). Most
people are moved to a community vault, where hundreds of skeletons can rest in
the same space that would be filled by half a dozen American-style graves. I
suppose this is what was happening to Yorick.
 
Only the very richest or most highly respected leaders can afford permanent
individual burial. My wife's wealthy family has a set of family vaults in which
older family members are pushed further back into the chamber as younger
members die.
 
Fervently hoping that my insensitive American brashness is not violating any
European sensitivity,
 
        john perry
        
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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Mack Gordon <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 11 Apr 95 09:48:11 -0500
Subject:        Shakespeare & Co, subjectivity, etc.
 
Thanks to Phyllis Rackin and G.L. Horton (via David Meyer) for their
information and comments on Shakespeare and Company. Due to the wonders of the
Internet, I tracked down the book G.L. Horton mentioned about Tina Packer; it's
called *The Companies She Keeps* by Helen Epstein. It was published by Plunkett
Lake Press in Cambridge, Mass. in 1985. ISBN is 0-96146960-9; LC #PN2287.P2E67.
My local public library has a copy which should soon arrive at my local branch.
 
I've been enjoying the "discussion" of early modern subjectivity. This morning
I came across this paragraph about Einstein from a book (*Recovering the Soul*)
by Larry Dossey which may (or may not) be relevant:
 
"Where did the individual begin and end for Einstein? The boundaries of the
person were seemingly far-flung. We get a hint of this view in his attitude
about freedom of the will, in which he reveals his belief that we have
unseverable ties with all the things and events of the world--an affinity which
is so intimate that the entire question of individual freedom is nonsensical.
Our concept of freedom of the will in one sense is very limited, implying an
isolated individual situated in the here-and-now who can exercise it. Einstein
does not share this local concept. For him, freedom of the will is tied to an
endless chain of events extending far into the past in an indefinitely large
expansion."
 
For what it's worth! --Chris Gordon
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Gieskes <
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Date:           Tuesday, 11 Apr 1995 09:33:06 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        The Spanish Tragedy
 
To all SHAKSPEReans--
 
Willing Suspension Productions, in association with Boston University's
Humanities Foundation, is presenting Thomas Kyd's _The Spanish Tragedy_
directed by Andrew Hartley April 21, 22, and 23.
 
Showtimes are:  April 21-- 7:30pm, April 22-- 7:30pm, April 23-- 2:30 and
7:30pm.  All performances take place on the Boston University campus in the
College of Liberal Arts Building (725 Commonwealth Avenue) Room 522.
 
Ticket prices are $5 for students and $6 general admission.
 
Willing Suspension is an amateur theatre group composed primarily of graduate
students in BU's English Department and is dedicated to producing seldom
performed early modern plays.  In past years, Willing Suspension has produced
Ben Jonson's _The Alchemist_ and Thomas Middleton's _The Revenger's Tragedy_.
 
For further information contact:
        via email: Ed Gieskes <
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        via regular mail: Andrew Hartley or Lauren Kehoe
                        Department of English
                        236 Bay State Road
                        Boston MA 02215
        via telephone: 617-353-2506
 

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