Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: April ::
Qs: *R2*; Productions of *Rom.*; *Lucrece*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0297.  Friday, 14 April 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Zoltan Abraham <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 13 Apr 1995 12:49:38 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Richard II
 
(2)     From:   Milla Riggio <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 14 Apr 1995 01:31:09 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   [Productions of *Rom.*]
 
(3)     From:   John Ammerman <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 13 Apr 1995 18:55:15 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   The Rape of Lucrece and me
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Zoltan Abraham <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 13 Apr 1995 12:49:38 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Richard II
 
I was wondering about different approaches that have been taken while staging
V, iii of _Richard II_, the scene where Aumerle and the Duchess beg Bolingbroke
to pardon Aumerle, whereas York demands that he condemn him. The rhymes seem
really to have misfired in this scene. How can you get around them, especially
considering that most (if not all) of the lines are end-stopped?
 
From what I gather, the scene is supposed to be serious; in fact this is a key
scene for the character of Bolingbroke, who demonstrates his merciful side and
his ability to be a judicious king -- unlike Richard, who didn't hesitate to
betray his closest allies and would probably never have pardoned a conspirator.
However, the rhymes are so ineffective in this scene -- especially for today's
audiences who do not seem to like this degree of formality -- that if the
rhymes are allowed to be followed by the audience, the effect is likely to be
comic. Nevertheless, I have a fundamental disagreement with cutting this scene.
Any thoughts?
 
Zoltan (Abraham)
Undergrad student
Seattle University
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Milla Riggio <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 14 Apr 1995 01:31:09 -0500 (EST)
Subject:
 
A request prefaced by a plea:
 
First, the plea:  Lonnie Durham suggests that the villains of Sh. plays are,
following BERNARD Spivack, all "vice figures," like Diccon of Gammer Gurton's
Needle.  May I suggest that Spivack by levelling all plays with moral plots
into one category of drama and in so doing inventing a somewhat specious
history for the character he calls the "vice" has constructed one big garden
path, which I do not recommend we meander along.  Even for characters, like
Richard III and Falstaff, who are alluded to as "vice" characters in the plays
themselves, the term is finally inadequate even if somewhat meaningful.
Richard III does more than "run out of steam" after he's steamrolled over
everyone in his path.  He develops a conscience of his own, has bad dreams, is
haunted by those he's murdered and dies in a different vein than that in which
he merrily murdered!  Iago belongs to a different tradition altogether, and he
- like Richard - radically alters the tradition from which he emerges!
 
Now, the request:  I'm beginning to accumulate sources and good reading matter
as part of my assignment as dramaturg for an upcoming production of Romeo and
Juliet.  I'd love to hear from those who have worked extensively on this play,
either in production or not, about what you might regard as the best half-dozen
sources (essays or books) on the play.  What should I definitely not leave off
the reading list I'm compiling for the director?  You may reply to me at the
address below, and as usual, thanks.
 

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 
Gratefully,
Milla Riggio
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Ammerman <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 13 Apr 1995 18:55:15 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        The Rape of Lucrece and me
 
Shakespeare's narrative poem *The Rape of Lucrece* has never been unanimously
praised by literary critics.  Generations of reviewers have found in its lines
nothing more than mere rhetorical ornamentation. Several examples of this
attitude can be found by simply flipping randomly through various introductions
found on the library shelves. It is easy to accept the authority of these
experts who have come to such a broad consensus as to the mediocrity of
Shakespeare's *graver labor,* consensus that is only reinforced after
comparing Shakespeare's long rhetorical enlargement to the simple elegance of
the originals by Livy and Ovid which, we are told, are the primary sources for
Shakespeare. Yet the above unanimity of opinion ignores one thousand years of
Christian reinterpretation of the Lucretia tale by such writers such as St.
Augustine (City of God 1:19), and Chaucer (The Legend of Good Women) which when
taken into account,  enriches Shakespeare=D5s poem with a tragic irony and
provide an additional layer of meaning to his *excess* rhetoric.   This meaning
was no doubt taken for granted by the original audience but has been overlooked
as a result of the subsequent secularization of Western thought.
 
I am currently working on a paper concerning this tragic irony in Lucrece.
What I am looking for specifically are instances of irony within the poem.  I
have made quite a bit of progress in this but have recently started
experiencing writer's block.  Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
 
Thanks,
John Ammerman
The Evergreen State College
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.