Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: April ::
Re: Ideology and Subjectivity
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0314.  Tuesday, 18 April 1995.
 
(1)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 17 Apr 1995 13:45:49 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0307  Re: Ideology and Subjectivity
 
(2)     From:   William Proctor Williams <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 17 Apr 95 15:52 CDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0307  Re: Ideology and Subjectivity
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Apr 1995 13:45:49 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0307  Re: Ideology and Subjectivity
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0307  Re: Ideology and Subjectivity
 
Since we are all one species, our genetic makeup is very similar. I apologize
for my less precise usage. And since men and women can breed, that fact would
suggest further that they are not separate species. We are all in this
together.
 
My point about cultural diversity is that belief in cultural diversity cannot
be used as a political test. My point about "race" and "culture" is that some,
if not many, antropologists question the usefulness (in antropology) of the
term "race" except as it is synonymous with "culture." We are all varieties of
one species.
 
Concerning Terry Hawkes' comments on "early modern," I leave him to further
explain what he meant. But it made me consider the use of "Renaissance" and
"early modern" and "Tudor" and "Elizabethan" and so on. These terms carry a lot
of baggage, and for those of us who want to try for neutrality, it might be
more accurate to use dates.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Proctor Williams <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Apr 95 15:52 CDT
Subject: 6.0307  Re: Ideology and Subjectivity
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0307  Re: Ideology and Subjectivity
 
The Great Change was/were the European Renaissance and, in English, the Great
Vowel Shift.  I thought these were givens--guess I'm wrong.  If you add to that
the English Reformation, then I think we have enough differences between, let
us say 1425 and 1535, to make not only cultural changes occur, but also
linguistic/literary changes, theological changes, sociological changes, etc.
 
In the old days (1950s and 1960s) when all graduate students had to take
courses in Bibliography, and History of the English Language, and Old English
these were not, I think, questions which needed to be asked.
 
Sorry if this sounds "old curmudgeonly," but that is how I currently feel.
 
William Proctor Williams
Department of English
Northern Illinois University
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.