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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: April ::
Re: Shakespeare and Africa
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0330.  Saturday, 22 April 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Scott Crozier <
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        Date:   Friday, 21 Apr 1995 09:53:45 +1100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0317  Qs: Shakespeare and Africa
 
(2)     From:   JC Stirm <
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        Date:   Friday, 21 Apr 95 09:11 PDT
        Subj:   English and Africa
 
(3)     From:   Kimberly Nolan <
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        Date:   Friday, 21 Apr 1995 14:03:27 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Shakespeare and Africa
 
(4)     From:   Marcello Cappuzzo <
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        Date:   Saturday, 22 Apr 95 0:31:31 CEST
        Subj:   [Shakespeare and Africa]
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Crozier <
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Date:           Friday, 21 Apr 1995 09:53:45 +1100
Subject: 6.0317  Qs: Shakespeare and Africa
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0317  Qs: Shakespeare and Africa
 
Marcello Cappuzzo, this may be of some help to you. John Gillies has recently
published a work titled *Shakespeare and the Geography of Distance*, Cambridge
University Press. Although this doesn't mention Africa specifically, Gillies
looks at Shakespeare's complex mental universe.
 
Cheers,
Scott Crozier
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           JC Stirm <
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Date:           Friday, 21 Apr 95 09:11 PDT
Subject:        English and Africa
 
Dear SHAKSPERians,
 
The recent questions about early modern English ideas abut Africa reminded me
of some materials I haven't seen suggested yet, so here's a short (and
incomplete) list of works I've found which might be useful:
 
Ania Loomba, *Gender, Race, Renaissance Drama*  (mostly re India, but there
might be helpful stuff), 1989 Vaughan and Vaughan, *Shakespeare's Caliban: A
Cultural History*, 1991
 
Jack D'Amico, *The Moor in English Renaissance Drama*, 1991 Hendricks and
Parker, eds.  *Women, "Race," and Writing in Early Modern England*, 1994
 
Kenneth R Andrews, *Trade, Plunder, and Settlement: Maritime Enterprise and the
Genesis of the British Empire, 1480-1630*, 1984
 
Emily C. Bartels, "Imperialist Beginnings: Richard Hakluyt and the Construction
of Africa," *Criticism*, 1992
 
Contemporary materials (including earlier stuff available then, but not
dramatic works):
 
Sir Thomas Browne, "Of the Blackness of Negroes" (ch 10 in the sixth book of
*Pseudodoxia*)
 
Richard Hakluyt, *The Principle Navigations...*
 
John Leo, *A Geographical Historie of Africa*
 
Pliny's *Natural History*
 
Heroclitus
 
Hope this helps,  best,
Jan Stirm

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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kimberly Nolan <
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Date:           Friday, 21 Apr 1995 14:03:27 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Shakespeare and Africa
 
I have 2 sources you might want to check on.  Last spring Patricia Parker
delivered a paper at Univ. of Miami that dealt with Othello and travel
narratives of Africa.  I see that she is co-editor of a book *Women, Race &
Writing in Early Modern England* The article she gave as a talk seems to be in
that book along with some other very interesting titles.
 
Also, Anthony Barthelemy has a book *Black Face, Maligned Race* that might be
useful.
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marcello Cappuzzo <
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Date:           Saturday, 22 Apr 95 0:31:31 CEST
Subject:        [Shakespeare and Africa]
 
Dear Colleagues,
 
Thank you very much for your generous responses to my message on Shakespeare
and Africa.  Goldsmith's definition of friendship -- "a disinterested commerce
between equals" -- is certainly more defensible (though "commerce" sounds a bit
awkward in this context) than Bacon's statement that there is little friendship
in the world, "and least of all between equals".
 
Yes, I like this SHAKSPER of friendly colleagues ("equals")! Btw: a few days
ago we all -- I presume -- received "a formal Request For Discussion (RFD) on
the subject of creating [a new] Usenet newsgroup:  humanities.literature.
shakespeare."  One of the main points of the proponent's rationale is that the
new group "will be unmoderated, unlike the listserv group (SHAKSPER) which is
moderated and has banned discussion on certain subjects such as the possible
pseudonymity of the name, Shakespeare."
 
Well, excuse me, but I _must_ give voice to my patriotic pride. At last the
"English" bard will be restored to his real identity -- that of the Italian
gentiluomo Signor Guglielmo Scotilanza. This should have happened some fifty
years ago, but at that time one way or another "la perfida Albione" managed to
have the better of her opponents.  Now time's up -- justice shall prevail!
 
On the other hand, I ask myself if the creation of a new group for discussion
of Scotilanza and surroundings can really be useful and will not, on the
contrary, result in an unnecessary duplication -- or, worse, in a fragmentation
-- of the present "listserv group" (which certainly _is_ moderated, but -- it
seems to me -- in a decidedly reasonable, temperate, "moderate" manner).
 
Yours,
Marcello Cappuzzo
University of Palermo
 

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