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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: April ::
Re: Applause Folio; Subjectivity; *Mac.*; Stratford
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0333.  Saturday, 22 April 1995.
 
(1)     From:   John W. Mahon <JWM1@IONA>
        Date:   Friday, 21 Apr 95 19:37:04 EST
        Subj:   SHK 6.0323 Re: Applause Folio;
 
(2)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Friday, 21 Apr 1995 22:24:33 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0326  Re: Ideology and Subjectivity
 
(3)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Friday, 21 Apr 1995 22:59:15 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0327  *Mac.* Discussions
 
(4)     From:   Peggy Galbraith <
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        Date:   Friday, 21 Apr 1995 14:44:20 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0328 Stratford
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John W. Mahon <JWM1@IONA>
Date:           Friday, 21 Apr 95 19:37:04 EST
Subject: Re: Applause Folio;
Comment:        SHK 6.0323 Re: Applause Folio;
 
The Easter Week comments on the Applause First Folio from Eric Armstrong, Skip
Shand, and Nick Ranson have been especially interesting, since I am preparing a
review of the Applause facsimile for the upcoming SPRING 1995 issue of THE
SHAKESPEARE NEWSLETTER (published by Iona College, New Rochelle, NY 10801).
 
As Eric Armstrong suggests, it is difficult to see how the text of the First
Folio can serve as anything but supplement to most of us, actors or teachers,
and yet we must also be grateful to Applause for making the text available at a
relatively inexpensive price.  It is disturbing to think that Norton would try
to stop sales of such a useful aid to our work as Shakespeareans.
 
-John W. Mahon, Co-Editor, THE SHAKESPEARE NEWSLETTER
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Friday, 21 Apr 1995 22:24:33 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0326  Re: Ideology and Subjectivity
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0326  Re: Ideology and Subjectivity
 
Moray McConnachie will be pleased to know (I hope) that I do not accept the
idea that 16th-17th century people did not have "subjectivity." But that
position has be put forward. I reject it. Gravity and North America existed
before they were "discovered."
 
Tom Bishop notes that suicide is a form of freedom -- free will. You can always
opt out.
 
Unfortunately, I have the firm faith -- backed up in this case by textual
evidence (which Tom will appreciate after his recent note in SQ on *MAC* 5.1)
-- that Cleopatra was pushed toward suicide by Dolabella acting as Caesar's
agent. Tom, look at Folio A&C TLN 3108-3199, and notice what the editors have
done to Dolabella's lines. Whatever can Caesar mean when he says: "Let him
[Dolabella] alone: for I remember now/How hee's imployed: he shall in time be
ready" (TLN 3193-4)? For what?
 
Who does Antony tell Cleopatra to trust? Who is immediately replaced by
Dolabella after Cleo's capture? Who does Caesar entrust with the burial of the
noble couple? When Dolabella first appears in the play, who is his partner?
 
When you capture a hostile queen, what do you have to do with her? Take her to
your capital city? Think of Mary, Queen of Scots.
 
Paranoidly yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Friday, 21 Apr 1995 22:59:15 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0327  *Mac.* Discussions
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0327  *Mac.* Discussions
 
I'm answering Scott Shepherd's contention that the second scene of *MAC* deals
with only one battle. The lines quoted in the last posting are not sufficient
to establish that as a proven fact. (I still have my copy of the Norton Folio
on my lap. Nice book.) Notice that bloody Captain says that Macdonwald is
"supply'd" "from the Westerne Isles" (TLN 32, 31). Fife is in eastern Scotland,
of course, and it would be hard to supply a rebel in eastern Scotland from the
western isles.
 
Rosse enters (TLN 66) with Angus "Fome Fife" (73). Now, if the battle were in
one place, would the King have to ask where his thane was coming from? Wouldn't
he assume that he was coming from "THE" battle?
 
Now, I admit that my questions (in this case) do not lead to a completely
satisfactory answer, but, Scott, don't they at least suggest a certain
"dubeity" in this scene? And isn't is just possible that Bellona's bridegroom
in not Macbeth?
 
Of course, since Bellona is a virgin, Macbeth as her bridegroom does make a lot
of imaginative sense!
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peggy Galbraith <
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Date:           Friday, 21 Apr 1995 14:44:20 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 6.0328 Stratford
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0328 Stratford
 
Dear Bill Dynes:
 
I missed your original question, but I have guessed from the answers I've seen
that you were looking for information about the Stratford Festival. I live "in
real life" about 5 hours from Stratford, and have attended it for 5 summers
now.  The best experience I had there was a long talk over coffee with Colm
Feore (then of Hamlet, who might be more recognizable now as Glenn Gould), who
I ran into in one of the shops in town.  I went during high school as part of a
summer enrichment program, so we also had the opportunity to attend many
organized lectures.  I would definitely suggest trying to schedule a tour of
the costume and props department...they're fascinating, and all the people who
work backstage were very willing to answer questions, as well as being
tremendously talented, of course.  Finally, just a note on a possible
discussion or paper topic-while I was there, my instructor assigned an essay on
how the authentic layout of the theaters (designed to resemble The Globe)
affected the staging and effectiveness of the plays.  I went on to turn this 2
page essay into a 25 page term paper, so I'm sure that there's plenty of
information out there.  Have a great time; I'm really bitter that I'm staying
down here in Durham this summer and I won't be able to make any of the shows!
 
Yours, peggy
 

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