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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: April ::
Re: Titus; Macduff; Cordelia; Western Isles
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0343.  Thursday, 27 April 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Sarah Cave <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Apr 1995 09:02:00 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0337  Re: *Titus*
 
(2)     From:   Scott Shepherd <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Apr 1995 17:25:54 -0400
        Subj:   *Mac*
 
(3)     From:   Susan Mather <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Apr 1995 17:26:33 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0336  Re: The Ending of *Lear*
 
(4)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Apr 1995 12:36:43 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0341  Re: Western Isles
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sarah Cave <
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Date:           Tuesday, 25 Apr 1995 09:02:00 EST
Subject: 6.0337  Re: *Titus*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0337  Re: *Titus*
 
I would like to add my two cents in TITUS' defense. While horrific and at times
melodramatic, it nonetheless is a very "good" play and deserves to be
performed. In Atlanta this year performances of TITUS were well attended, and
the truths that made the play powerful in Shakespeare's day remain inherent in
our society.
 
I also think that Tamora's speech to Aaron contains lush imagery and poetry
that we see to a greater extent in Titania's lines in MIDSUMMER.
 
Sincerely,
Sarah Cave
Agnes Scott College

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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Shepherd <
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Date:           Tuesday, 25 Apr 1995 17:25:54 -0400
Subject:        *Mac*
 
After that last *Mac* post me and Bill Godshalk stepped outside and settled a
few things e-man to e-man.
 
Just kidding. Actually I wasn't trying to be vicious in that post at all. I
guess I came on a little strong. Lucid, definitive, vigorous--that's the sort
of thing I was going for. Oh well.
 
What I meant to say: I understand the appeal of this Macduff suggestion, it's
imaginative, makes sense, has interesting implications. But the textual
problems that gave rise to it in the first place are, upon analysis,
nonproblems.
 
That's what I meant. Sorry Bill.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susan Mather <
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Date:           Tuesday, 25 Apr 1995 17:26:33 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 6.0336  Re: The Ending of *Lear*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0336  Re: The Ending of *Lear*
 
I don't know that you can fault Cordelia for calling Lear, "your majesty".
According to Catherine Belsey in her book, The Subject of Tragedy, silence
usually was a virtue in women as in children; women were to speak only when
spoken to and with reverance I believe as children ought to show their elders.
Cordelia may simply represent the relationship between men and women, husbands
and wives during the renaissance--and perhaps Shakespeare uses Cordelia's
response which is typical to contrast with Goneril and Regan's flatteries.
Kent says that Cordelia speaks plainly (and I'm probably going to butcher this)
when power to flattery bows.
 
I am currently working on a paper for my King Lear class that deals with the
subject of Lear's relationship with Cordelia as an anima figure.  (C.G. Jung)
So that Cordelia with reverance causes Lear to loose the persona he has
created, to pull away from looking to his children as possible mirrors, to
finally, become a whole person, separate and distinct from others.  Tell me
what you-all think.
 
                                Thanks you,
                                Susan M. Mather
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Wednesday, 26 Apr 1995 12:36:43 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0341  Re: Western Isles
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0341  Re: Western Isles
 
Dave Evett's suggestion of moving Irish troops up the Clyde and then marching
them overland to Fife is very good. Were I the Scots general, I'd wait until
the Irish had left their ships at Clyde's head -- minimally guarded -- and I'd
wait until the main Irish force was well on the way to Fife before I'd fall on
those ships with my main force and either burn them or take them into my own
navy.
 
I would not impede the Irish entry into Fife, which is funnel-shaped, but I
would seal up their retreat. I'd probably push the remnant into the sea around
St. Andrews or Kirkcaldy -- at my whim.
 
Your move, General Evett.
 
Yours, Wild Bl Godshalk (of the Curl Clan)
 

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