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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: April ::
Qs: PC and Productions; Textbooks; Macready's Hamlet
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0349.  Friday, 28 April 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Ian Doescher <
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        Date:   Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 08:58:52 -0700
        Subj:   Racism, sexism in "Merchant," "Taming"
 
(2)     From:   Gayle Gaskill <
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        Date:   Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 20:18:22 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Advice on Textbooks
 
(3)     From:   Paul Alan Macdonald <
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        Date:   Friday, 28 Apr 1995 13:57:51 -0400 (AST)
        Subj:   Macready's Hamlet
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ian Doescher <
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Date:           Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 08:58:52 -0700
Subject:        Racism, sexism in "Merchant," "Taming"
 
In our politically correct society, how ought directors or performers deal with
the issues of racism and sexism in "Merchant of Venice" and "Taming of the
Shrew?"  Quite clearly, the racism against Shylock must be dealt with in order
to be appropriate for modern audiences, as well as the inherent sexist
attitudes towards Kate.  Should directors nowadays concern themselves with
making their productions point out the negativity of racism and sexism?  Or is
it not a director's responsibility to be sensitive to an audience?
 
Just wondering.
Ian Doescher
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gayle Gaskill <
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Date:           Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 20:18:22 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Advice on Textbooks
 
I'd welcome advice for choosing texts for two of my classes next year:
 
1.  The Bible in literture.
2.  The Age of Elizabeth: Politics and Literature in the Reign of Elizabeth I.
And does anyone know how to get the videos of the _Elizabeth R_ series Glenda
Jackson did for--I suppose the BBC, which Masterpiece Theatre played years ago?
And could students bear to watch thoee videos in 1996?
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Alan Macdonald <
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Date:           Friday, 28 Apr 1995 13:57:51 -0400 (AST)
Subject:        Macready's Hamlet
 
Hello Everyone:
 
This is my first time posting here, so a great big HELLO to all you
SHAKESPEARians out there. Presently, I'm doing my graduate work on the Play
Scene in "Hamlet", with the main focus being on its presentation by Macready,
Irving, and Beerbohm-Tree.
 
The Macready section is proving to be a little tricky, however, in that I am
looking at his 1838 "Hamlet" at Covent Garden and cannot find any critical
reviews of the production (with the exception of a short article in
"Spectator", Vol. XI). I've seen his diaries and most of the scholarly books
that cover his career, but none of them address this particular production in
any detail. Does anyone have any suggestions? I would really be interested in
reviews that are contemporary to the production, especially if  they discuss
the set, props, staging etc (Clarkson Stanfield was the set designer).
 
Also, there was a series of sketches done on the productions at Covant Garden
during the 1838/39 season by George Scharf and I would love to get some info on
him and his work.
 
If you have any ideas and/or questions, please feel free to E-Mail me directly.
 
Thanks in advance,
paul
 

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