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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: May ::
Re: Textbooks
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0360.  Thursday, 4 May 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Eric Armstrong <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 3 May 1995 10:47:07 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0357  Re: Textbooks
 
(2)     From:   David Lindley <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 3 May 1995 16:18:20 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0357 Re: Textbooks
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Eric Armstrong <
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Date:           Wednesday, 3 May 1995 10:47:07 -0400
Subject: 6.0357  Re: Textbooks
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0357  Re: Textbooks
 
I have enjoyed following the thread on Textbooks and it has made me think about
books that I have heard recommended to students. One text that I have heard
questioned recently is Tillyard's "Elizabethan World Picture". This tiny tome
certainly helped me, and I assume many others, to understand the Elizabethan
world as it is revealed in Shakespeare. But of late, due to hanging out with
some "Shakespeare academics", I have heard that Tillyard is BIASED. Over
patriotic and all that.
 
What I want to know is:
 
1. Is Tillyard really all that bad?
 
2. Is there something "new" that covers the same world picture, but maybe
has taken some '90s Windex to the glass so we can see something else
lurking in that dark, dark picture?
 
Thanks,
Eric Armstrong.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Lindley <
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Date:           Wednesday, 3 May 1995 16:18:20 GMT
Subject: 6.0357 Re: Textbooks
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0357 Re: Textbooks
 
No anthology is ever 'right' for teaching, in my experience - but I Alan Rosen
might find David Norbrook's anthology, The Penguin Book of Renaissance Verse,
1509-1659 worth a look - the poems are arranged by topic, rather than by
author, and he includes a good deal of relatively unfamiliar material. It is,
of course, therefore shorter on some of the poems one might expect to find by
the 'big names', and one would probably want to supplement it with other
material. I've certainly learnt a lot from it.
 
David Lindley
 

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