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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: May ::
Qs: Hypermedia Project; *Oth.* Verse
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0370.  Wednesday, 10 May 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Robert Knapp <
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        Date:   Thursday, 04 May 94 08:18:02 PDT
        Subj:   Hypertext/Hypermedia
 
(2)     From:   Emmanuel Kowalski <
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        Date:   Friday, 5 May 1995 09:28:56 MET-1DST
        Subj:   A Question about a Verse in Othello
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Knapp <
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Date:           Thursday, 04 May 94 08:18:02 PDT
Subject:        Hypertext/Hypermedia
 
Does anyone have information about the current state of the MIT/Stanford
project (under development by Peter Donaldson, Larry Friendlander, and Janet
Murray) that was demonstrated at the Atlanta SAA?
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Emmanuel Kowalski <
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Date:           Friday, 5 May 1995 09:28:56 MET-1DST
Subject:        A Question about a Verse in Othello
 
This being my first post, Greetings to all SHAKSPEReans, and especially to
Hardy Cook...
 
In his short story "Pierre Menard, author of Don Quixote", Borges mentions the
following verse found in Othello (near the end of Othello's last long speech,
I'm sorry I don't have a line-number) :
        Where a malignant and a turban'd Turk
which he praises for its strange use of a descriptive and a moral adjective.
 
I was discussing this with a friend recently who thought it was merely
rhetorical, and brought no deeper meaning to the speech. I thought it would be
as good an occasion as any to write a first post to SHAKSPER to ask about it,
so: do you think this particular verse adds to the understanding of Othello,
and how/why? Does it have any special function in the speech? As a  subsidiary
question, talking of Borges: what do Shakespearian scholars/actors/specialists
think of his criticism and allusions to Shakespeare in general? I have in mind
for example a preface he wrote to an edition of "Macbeth" and his short text
"Everything and nothing"  - which appeared in a book called "El Hacedor" in
spanish ("L'Auteur" in french), although I don't know the english title.
 
And, by the way, do you know other instances of this same "zeugmatic" construct
in Shakespeare or other writers? I'm afraid this is already too long for such a
simple query. I hope I haven't taken too much of your time.
 
        Emmanuel Kowalski
        
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