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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: May ::
Re: Folger Institute; Tillyard; Shakespeare Globe on
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0389.  Monday, 15 May 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Skip Shand <
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        Date:   Sunday, 14 May 1995 12:03:06 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0387  Folger Institute
 
(2)     From:   Robert Appelbaum <
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        Date:   Sunday, 14 May 1995 11:08:36 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Tillyard
 
(3)     From:   Andreas Schlenger <
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        Date:   Monday, 15 May 1995 14:32:08 +0200 (MET DST)
        Subj:   Shakespeare Globe on WWW (Cologne)
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Skip Shand <
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Date:           Sunday, 14 May 1995 12:03:06 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0387  Folger Institute
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0387  Folger Institute
 
A query/suggestion to Georgianna Ziegler re the Folger Institute and the full
NEH sponsorship of "fifteen faculty members chosen to participate": Will the
NEH sponsor citizens of countries other than the U.S.A.? If not, as I believe
has always (and quite understandably, I might add) been the case in the past,
then maybe the broadly international readership of SHAKSPER deserves to be
reminded that you mean "fifteen *American* faculty members"--just so the rest
of us, particularly those who actually live within reach of the Folger, don't
start dreaming impossible dreams!
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Appelbaum <
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Date:           Sunday, 14 May 1995 11:08:36 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Tillyard
 
I seem to recall Jonathan Dollimore dispensing with Tillyard rather decisively
in *Radical Tragedy* some ten years ago.  But the problem isn't that Tillyard
is "dated"; in fact, a number of British historians (Kevin Sharpe and J.P.
Kenyon, for example) still cling to the Tillyard view.  The problem has to do
with how literary evidence is used for deciding cultural-historical questions,
and how our concepts of culture and history and especially cultural history are
to be fashioned.  In brief, the Tillyard approach encourages to look for
consensus.  What many of us are doing nowadays (I think) is looking for
conflict.  Ulysses's speech in *Troilus* can be taken as evidence for a
worldview (which it is our misfortune to have lost, perhaps); or it can be
taken as evidence of a conflict in the social order which Shakespeare is
putting in the mouth of Ulysses, a conflict in the "observance of degree" which
Ulysses can be seen to be somewhat hysterically and ineffectually responding
to. I'm particularly interested in the political experience of the Jacobean
period, concerning which the drama is often our best evidence (since so much
else was subject to censorship), and would be interested in hearing how others
respond to this issue.
 
-- Robert Appelbaum
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andreas Schlenger <
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Date:           Monday, 15 May 1995 14:32:08 +0200 (MET DST)
Subject:        Shakespeare Globe on WWW (Cologne)
 
Dear members of SHAKSPER!
 
Please allow me to draw your attention to a new, illustrated item on our
International Shakespeare Globe Centre Germany Web Page: THE ELIZABETHAN
THEATRE, a "tagged" lecture Professor Hilda D. Spear held at Cologne University
in 1989.
 
It's URL is:
 
http://www.rrz.uni-koeln.de/phil-fak/englisch/shakespeare/spear.html
 
Regards,
Andreas Schlenger
University of Cologne

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