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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: May ::
Qs: Marxism; *Cor.* Recording
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0405.  Saturday, 20 May 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Lynn A. Parks <
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        Date:   Thursday, 18 May 1995 13:21:16 CST
        Subj:   Re: Marxism query
 
(2)     From:   Robert F. O'Connor <
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        Date:   Friday, 19 May 1995 10:12:22 +0700
        Subj:   Coriolanus recording
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lynn A. Parks <
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Date:           Thursday, 18 May 1995 13:21:16 CST
Subject:        Re: Marxism query
 
Help!
 
My literary criticism background is pretty scanty, and my knowledge of
Shakespeare scholarship is pretty general (and fading quickly), so when people
use the term "Marxism," I suspect I have a distorted view of what that means.
How does Marxism fit into the broader category of sociological criticism?  What
are the authoritative statements about what Marxist criticism means?  Are there
"classic" Marxist treatments of Shakespeare?
 
Please reply directly to me if responses seem too peripheral to be posted to
the listserv, and thanks in advance for any direction/clarification you can
give.
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert F. O'Connor <
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Date:           Friday, 19 May 1995 10:12:22 +0700
Subject:        Coriolanus recording
 
Dear everybody,
 
Amongst all of the discussions about various Hamlets of late, someone mentioned
a recording of Burton perfroming a 'young' Coriolanus.  An intriguing idea.
 
Can anyone with the details of this recording (when & where & sources, cat.
no's, whatever) e-mail me direct?  I'm trying to get somewhere with this
awkward play and my only preformance sources thus far are the BBC version and a
bloody terrible production in Sydney two years ago.
 
Ta
 
Robert F. O'Connor

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English Department
Australian National University
 

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