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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: May ::
Marxism; Advice; *Cor.* Recording; R-H *Ham*; Tillyard
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0407.  Monday, 22 May 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Christine Gray <
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        Date:   Saturday, 20 May 1995 23:39:56 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0405 Qs: Marxism; *...
 
(2)     From:   Kate Wilson <
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        Date:   Sunday, 21 May 1995 22:10:07 +1000 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0406 Re: Advice
 
(3)     From:   David M Richman <
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        Date:   Sunday, 21 May 1995 13:53:02 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0405 Qs: *Cor.* Recording
 
(4)     From:   Tom Dale Keever <
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        Date:   Monday, 22 May 1995 09:10:15 -0400
        Subj:   Round-House Hamlet
 
(5)     From:   Chris Fassler <
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        Date:   Monday, 22 May 1995 09:29:26 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Tillyard
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Gray <
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Date:           Saturday, 20 May 1995 23:39:56 -0400
Subject: 6.0405 Qs: Marxism; *...
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0405 Qs: Marxism; *...
 
<<Lynn A. Parks wrote, on Thursday, 18 May 1995
"Help!  My literary criticism background is pretty scanty, and my knowledge
of Shakespeare scholarship is pretty general (and fading quickly), so when
people use the term "Marxism," I suspect I have a distorted view of what that
means. How does Marxism fit into the broader category of sociological
criticism?  What are the authoritative statements about what Marxist
criticism means?  Are there "classic" Marxist treatments of Shakespeare?">>
 
I hope a repsonse to her queries is posted on the list.  I too, perhaps with
others, would like charification of/answers to these topics/questions.
 
 Thanks you, christine gray
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kate Wilson <
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Date:           Sunday, 21 May 1995 22:10:07 +1000 (EST)
Subject: 6.0406 Re: Advice
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0406 Re: Advice
 
. . . and one of the best Shakesperian whodunnits has to be Josephine Tey's
THE DAUGHTER OF TIME. Did Richard III really do it?
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David M Richman <
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Date:           Sunday, 21 May 1995 13:53:02 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 6.0405 Qs: *Cor.* Recording
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0405 Qs: *Cor.* Recording
 
During the 'fifties and early 'sixties, Caedmon Records produced all of
Shakespeare's on long playing records with big-name British actors. Coriolanus,
besides Burton, featured Jessica Tandy (does she count as Canadian?) as
Volumnia, Michael Hordern as Menenius, Robert Stephens as one of the tribunes,
and Kenneth Haigh as Aufidius.  The last time I did business with Caedmon,
their address was 505 Eighth Avenue, New York, NY USA. They may well have
moved, or merged.  Most, though not all,  of their stuff has been redone on
tape or CD.  That's all the information I have. Don't know the catalogue
number.
 
David Richman
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Dale Keever <
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Date:           Monday, 22 May 1995 09:10:15 -0400
Subject:        Round-House Hamlet
 
Kate Wilson rightly praises Tony Richardson's "Round-House" production of
HAMLET.  Fortunately it was committed to film, which is how I came to see it in
Michigan.  When I prepared to play Claudius here in NY at the Bouwerie Lane
Theater (in a production that ended up running two and a half years in rep!) it
was only Hopkins' performance that I recalled anything worth stealing from.
That was my first exposure, too, to Hopkins' talent.
 
The film was shot in the Round-House, but was very skillfully done.  It does
not feel like an archived stage video.  Besides the cast Kate mentioned, it
includes Michael Pennington as Laertes.
 
The film is still available and can be ordered from The Writing Company. Call
them at (800) 421-4246 for details.  It'll only set you back $19.95.
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Fassler <
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Date:           Monday, 22 May 1995 09:29:26 -0400
Subject:        Re: Tillyard
 
SHAKSPERians,
 
Here's to Robert Appelbaum's cogent and brief articulation of the Tillyard
issues:
 
"the problem isn't that Tillyard is 'dated'; in fact, a number of British
historians (Kevin Sharpe and J.P.  Kenyon, for example) still cling to the
Tillyard view.  The problem has to do with how literary evidence is used for
deciding cultural-historical questions, and how our concepts of culture and
history and especially cultural history are to be fashioned.  In brief, the
Tillyard approach encourages to look for consensus.  What many of us are doing
nowadays (I think) is looking for conflict."
 
While I also agree that drama is *among* the best evidence of "the political
experience of the Jacobean period," I think that its pre-eminence comes, in
part, from its complex *relation to* censorship, not from its *freedom from*
censorship, as R. A. suggests.
 
BTW: Thanks to all of you who helped make this year's Ohio Shakespeare
Conference interesting and fun.
 
--Chris Fassler
 

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