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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: May ::
Re: Sidney (Popular Culture); Marxism
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0415.  Thursday, 25 May 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Renee Pigeon <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 24 May 1995 08:31:32 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0414  Shakespeare and Popular Culture
 
(2)     From:   C.C. Warley <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 24 May 95 13:28:15 EDT
        Subj:   Marxist Advice
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Renee Pigeon <
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Date:           Wednesday, 24 May 1995 08:31:32 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 6.0414  Shakespeare and Popular Culture
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0414  Shakespeare and Popular Culture
 
As I'm sure many readers of the list will be quick to point out, there's a
problem with Chris Stroffolino's assertion in today's call for abstracts on
Shakespeare and Popular Culture that "From the records we have, Shakespeare's
plays were orginally scorned by his 'high culture' contemporaries such as Sir
Philip Sydney . . . "  Sidney died in 1586, and thus had no opportunity to
scorn (or praise) Shakespeare's work.
 
Renee Pigeon
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           C.C. Warley <
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Date:           Wednesday, 24 May 95 13:28:15 EDT
Subject:        Marxist Advice
 
Dear Christine Gray and Lynne Parks,
 
Robert Appelbaum is absolutely right - your question is a scorcher.  In
addition to his recommendations, I'd suggest that as further fire-proofing you
read Marx and Shakespeare and decide for yourself.  The section on "Estranged"
or "Alienated" (depending upon your translation) Labor in the 1844 Economic and
Philosophic Manuscripts, Part 1 of The German Ideology, and the section in
Capital Volume 1 on the Fetishism of Commodities might be good places to start.
 
If you really want to read a contemporary "Marxist" (whatever that means)
critic of Shakespeare, try Robert Weimann.
 
Dialectically yours,
Christopher Warley
Rutgers University
 

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