1995

Re; *Cor.* Recording; Marxism

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0412.  Wednesday, 24 May 1995.
 
(1)     From:   John Owen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 23 May 1995 10:01:08 -0700
        Subj:   RE: SHK 6.0408  Re: *Cor.* Recording
 
(2)     From:   Robert Appelbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 23 May 1995 13:29:04 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Marxist Advice
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Owen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 23 May 1995 10:01:08 -0700
Subject: 6.0408  Re: *Cor.* Recording
Comment:        RE: SHK 6.0408  Re: *Cor.* Recording
 
Correction - In my last post, I made an unfortunate typo. Gielgud fans will
know that it was Richard II, not Richard III that became one of Sir John's
signature roles and was recorded by Caedmon in 1960. Caedmon went officially
out of business a few years back, a loss to poetry and drama lovers everywhere.
HarperAudio has not been eager to revive the entire Caedmon stock, and many
recordings are simply no longer available. However, the Shakespeare corpus, due
to its popularity, is fairly easy to obtain at the number I have already
posted. Again, my regrets for the error.
 
John Owen
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Appelbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 23 May 1995 13:29:04 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Marxist Advice
 
Dear Christine Gray and Lynne Parks,
 
If you think the Tillyard question got a little hot, wait'll people start
responding to the Marxist question.  Personally I can't wait.  A quick read to
prepare yourself for it might be Terry Eagleton's *Literary Theory*.  Pierre
Machery's *Theory of Literary Production* might also be helpful.  And don't
forget the complete works of Bertolt Brecht. Good luck. -- Robert Appelbaum

Re: London and Stratford Seasons

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0411.  Wednesday, 24 May 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Luc Borot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 23 May 1995 19:56:01 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0410  Q: London and Stratford Seasons
 
(2)     From:   Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 May 1995 00:31:41 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0410  Q: London and Stratford Seasons
 
(3)     From:   Bob Gingher <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 May 1995 04:13:12 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0410 Q: London and Stratford Seasons
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Luc Borot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 23 May 1995 19:56:01 +0100
Subject: 6.0410  Q: London and Stratford Seasons
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0410  Q: London and Stratford Seasons
 
Kathryn Murphy Anderson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> asks:
>What productions are particularly worth seeing in London and Stratford this
>summer?  I'd be interested especially in productions of 16th and 17th c.
>material, but will be happy to have other suggestions as well.
 
I saw 4 plays at the RST and Swan last month. Taming and R&J at the RST are
very poor to unbearably appalling, according to mood, indulgence or taste. The
Taming is in very bad taste, both costume, acting styles, set, are over the
top, and don't solve most painful issues, but we've debated this matter
recently on SHAKSPER, haven't we... The last 2 or 3 minutes are interesting,
but add to the puzzle of the end in a very inconclusive way.
 
The R&J cast are mostly miscast, especially the 2 leading parts... Mercutio
(Mark Lockyer) and the Friar (Julian Glover) are good to very good. I was told
the rehearsals started (6 weeks before the start, as usual at the RST) without
Romeo or Juliet (I forget which) cast. I usually like Adrian Noble's
productions, but this one is very disappointing.
 
At the Swan, on the other hand, I saw Jonson's *The Devil is an Ass*, which has
never been played since its creation in 1616; it's an excellent play and an
excellent production, very inventive, with great comic power. I also saw
Vanbrugh's *The Relapse*, which I found very good, well acted, with a few
imperfections in movement, but as this was the beginning of the season, it's
bound to improve.
 
Of course, all this is terribly partial, but there seemed to be a kind of
consensus on the two Shakespeares.
 
                                Yours,
                                                Luc Borot
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 May 1995 00:31:41 +0100
Subject: 6.0410  Q: London and Stratford Seasons
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0410  Q: London and Stratford Seasons
 
At Stratford:
 
_Devil is an Ass_ with David Troughton and John Nettles is very good indeed.
This years _Romeo and Juliet_ and _The Taming of the Shrew_ are, in my opinion,
not worth crossing the street for. Of last year's RSC stuff still playing in
London (what a regionalist view I take!) I recall nothing special either.
 
I am prepared to type in a precis of newspaper reviews if anyone is interested;
and even expand on my dislike of the above productions!
 
Gabriel Egan
Shakespeare Institute of the U. of Birmingham UK
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bob Gingher <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 May 1995 04:13:12 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 6.0410 Q: London and Stratford Seasons
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0410 Q: London and Stratford Seasons
 
I will be in London for one week beginning June 19 and would be grateful
for any advice or commentary regarding current productions.
 
Sincerely,
Bob Gingher

Re: Tillyard; Advice

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0409.  Tuesday, 23 May 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Luc Borot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 22 May 95 17:03:05 +0200
        Subj:   Tillyard
 
(2)     From:   Dale Lyles <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 22 May 1995 22:21:28 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Request for advice
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Luc Borot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 22 May 95 17:03:05 +0200
Subject:        Tillyard
 
Most major objections to many of Tillyard's generalisations can be found in
Elizabethan intellectual productions themselves.
 
Have a glance at the piece on machiavellianism in his *History Plays*, in which
he states that it is impossible for an Elizabethan to just 'think' in those
terms. This is denied by the amount of machiavel-characters in Eliz. political
(and other drama), but also by the existence of political writings taking
reason of state (before Botero) into account. Ms translations of Machiavelli,
Italian editions, etc circulated and were read.
 
The Elizabethans of Tillyard's books were naive people who did not know what
power was all about. The queen knew that she was Richard II, in the days of the
Essex rebellion, didn't she? The chief ministers of the age were as capable of
manipulation, deceit and double-entendre as later statesmen. When a member of
Parliament was in session, could he be duped by the show of deference? In my
very humble opinion, Tillyard took the rhetoric for a real, practical attitude.
Very early on, Lily B. Campbell and BL Joseph did present a much less idealised
picture of Elizabethan attitudes towards the world of politics.
 
As regards other dimensions of Tillyard's books, I would not be so positive,
lacking direct competence, but I'm positive he missed a lot of irony and deceit
in his interpretation of Eliz. political ideas.
 
        Yours,
               Luc Borot
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dale Lyles <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 22 May 1995 22:21:28 -0400
Subject:        Re: Request for advice
 
I would think the Shakespearean insult books would be fun sellers.  Also,
bookmarks are easy: I know I treasure my two leather ones from RSC.
 
Dale Lyles

Q: London and Stratford Seasons

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0410.  Tuesday, 23 May 1995.
 
From:           Kathryn Murphy Anderson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 22 May 1995 13:33:17 -0400
Subject:        London and Stratford Seasons
 
What productions are particularly worth seeing in London and Stratford this
summer?  I'd be interested especially in productions of 16th and 17th c.
material, but will be happy to have other suggestions as well.
 
Thanks.  Kathryn Murphy Anderson.

Re: *Cor.* Recording

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0408.  Tuesday, 23 May 1995.
 
(1)     From:   John Owen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 22 May 1995 09:27:43 -0700
        Subj:   RE: SHK 6.0405  Qs: *Cor.* Recording
 
(2)     From:   Georgianna Ziegler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 22 May 95 11:36:00 PDT
        Subj:   RE: SHK 6.0405  Qs: *Cor.* Recording
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Owen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 22 May 1995 09:27:43 -0700
Subject: 6.0405  Qs: *Cor.* Recording
Comment:        RE: SHK 6.0405  Qs: *Cor.* Recording
 
Regarding the recording of Coriolanus, the entire Caedmon stock was purchased
by HarperCollins Inc. a number of years ago, and while I don't have the number
for Harper Audio (their spoken word label) handy, the customer service line is
800-328-3443. Caedmon's attempt to record ideal versions of Shakespeare has
never really been equalled. All but Timon of Athens and the Henry VI trilogy
were recorded, usually with great critical success. Scofield's Hamlet was
recorded in 1963, Gielgud's Richard III and Leontes somewhat earlier.
Coriolanus seems to be the one Shakespearean role in which Burton made an
unqualified success, and Caedmon got the whole thing, very much worth hearing.
Harper has remastered most of the series and repackaged them in inexpensive
cassette versions running well under $20.
 
John Owen
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Georgianna Ziegler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 22 May 95 11:36:00 PDT
Subject: 6.0405  Qs: *Cor.* Recording
Comment:        RE: SHK 6.0405  Qs: *Cor.* Recording
 
This is a reply to Robert O'Connor.  Richard Burton recorded Coriolanus for the
Shakespeare Recording Society of New York in 1962, along with Jessica Tandy as
Volumnia and Michael Hordern as Menenius.  The recording was made by Caedmon
Records and is a 3-record set, 33 1/3 lps.  The number is SRS-226.  I know that
Caedmon has made many of these recordings available on tape.  They are
distributed by  Harper-Collins,10 E. 53rd St., NY, NY 10022: phone:
212-207-7000; ask for their Audio division.

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