1995

Re: Music; Kiddieology

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0372.  Wednesday, 10 May 1995.
 
(1)     From:   David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 5 May 1995 11:23:26 GMT
        Subj:   Re: Music
 
(2)     From:   Daniel L. Colvin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 5 May 1995 12:58:27 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Kiddieology and Music
 
(3)     From:   Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
        Date:   Monday, 08 May 95 23:12:50 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0364  Kiddieology; Shakespeare and Company; Music
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 5 May 1995 11:23:26 GMT
Subject:        Re: Music
 
I can't agree with Roger Gross that no music is worse than canned music - not
because I hold any brief for canned music at all, but because the modern
practice of applying a cinematic 'surround sound' of incidental music in
performance seems to me profoundly to distort the ways in which music functions
within the play texts. I don't think that there are any examples of moments in
plays where the music the audience hears is not also heard by the characters on
stage (the odd counter-example, in The Tempest for instance, uses the failure
to hear music by Antonio and Sebastian as a moral marker). When texts want
'mood music' it is called for - in Twelfth Night for example; to supply more is
to risk at best devaluing, at worst distorting and simplifying  the verbal
texture. That, at least, is my view - one which, I recognise, is a mark of my
authenticist puritanism, and is vigorously opposed by most colleagues and
students!
 
(But I do agree that the music, such as is called for, should be 'live'.)
 
David Lindley
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Daniel L. Colvin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 5 May 1995 12:58:27 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Kiddieology and Music
 
As the semester draws to an end, I did want to respond to two recent posts.
 
Don Foster bemoans the new kiddie-lit popularizations of Shakespeare and
worries that we might have some of those students in our classes in the future.
 Actually, I would look forward to having those students.  I usually find that
students who are excited about Shakespeare -- as a result of any earlier
stimulus, no matter what type -- are the most interesting and able in my
classes.  And often they are some of the most creative when it comes to
envisioning staging of the plays or other "production" considerations. The way
things are here (a regional state university), I would be glad to get as many
students as I could.
 
Second,  let me second Roger Gross's comments regarding origional music. For
our recent production of *MACBETH* we had a composer from the music department
create original music.  He came to the fight rehearsals to get a feel for the
battles, and then actually scored the music to highlight the movements of the
battle.  He did the same for the Weird Sisters and for several other parts of
the play, besides creating music to open each of the three parts (acts) of the
play.  The music became an integral part of the experience.  I highly recommend
it.
 
Have a good end of the semester, friends, and a good summer.
 
Daniel Colvin
Western Illinois University
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
Date:           Monday, 08 May 95 23:12:50 EDT
Subject: 6.0364  Kiddieology; Shakespeare and Company; Music
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0364  Kiddieology; Shakespeare and Company; Music
 
Music and productions:
 
Susan Spector and I worked with composers for scores in the OTHELLO and the
TWELFTH NIGHT we've done in the last few years.  A delicious experience both
times.  With OTHELLO we were able to use electronic renaissance instruments
doing all kinds of tricks, like Othello's trumpeters coming closer and closer
during the entry into Cyprus scene.  Ah, electric echo-control!  And storms and
alarums built to order . . . CCNY's Digital Music Center was a great resource.
The TWELFTH NIGHT bounced along to calypso beats, some live, some recorded, all
original scores.
 
With enough lead time, collaboration with a music department's composition
classes might be a nice way to pull together otherwise distant or estranged
academic functions on  a liberal arts campus.
 
Advertising for a composer?  Offering a prize for a competition within a
composition class?  Any way one goes at the task, articulating thoughts about
overall  impact of a production and fine details of a moment's auditory blast
or whisper can radically aid any director's thoughts.  Actually, that might be
a valuable project for a group of students, to pound out tunes and rhythms of a
style appropriate to a specific scene set to underscore specific production
conditions. "Invent a musical accompaniment for ____________."
 
From the budgetary whirlwind of CCNY,
                   Steve Whirledowitz This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Applause Folio; Tillyard

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0371.  Wednesday, 10 May 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Eddie Duggan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 7 May 95 8:35:53 BST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0323 Re: Applause Folio
 
(2)     From:   Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 10 May 1995 08:45:16 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0333  Re: Applause Folio
 
(3)     From:   An Sonjae <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 6 May 1995 10:39:34 +0900 (KST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0360 Re: Textbooks
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Eddie Duggan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 7 May 95 8:35:53 BST
Subject: 6.0323 Re: Applause Folio
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0323 Re: Applause Folio
 
A note of interest to London-based UK subscribers to the list:
 
The paperback facsimile of the first folio is available in a WC1 bookshop,
priced at #40 uk.
 
I saw the book in the window of Jack Duncan (Cartoons and Books)]
44 Museum Street
London WC1A 1LY
+44 0171 242 5335
fax +44 0171 242 2978
 
The bookshop is located about two minutes away from the British Museum.
(needless to add, I have no interest in the shop, but am merely relaying
information).  The man at the desk claims to be the only uk source of the text.
 
Eddie Duggan
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 10 May 1995 08:45:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0333  Re: Applause Folio
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0333  Re: Applause Folio
 
On the question of Norton's response to the publication of an inexpensive
facsimile of the Folio:  I understand that, faced with the possibility that
someone as for instance at the Folger Library might want to bring out a folio
edition, since the Norton is now unavailable, Norton is in fact planning to
re-release its own, or perhaps to update its own facsimile edition.  Someone
with more information may want to confirm this rumor, but it does at least
explain the profit motive behind the wish to deny cheaper - i.e., less
expensive - editions of the facsimile.
 
Milla Riggio
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           An Sonjae <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 6 May 1995 10:39:34 +0900 (KST)
Subject: 6.0360 Re: Textbooks
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0360 Re: Textbooks
 
The question as to whether Tillyard can be trusted might be found surprising;
in the fifty years or so since he read Tillyard quite a lot of rather eminent
scholars and good thinkers have written about the way Shakespeare and his
contemporaries experienced reality, and a lot of them have included critical
discussions of Tillyard. Has the questioner not read anything of this?
Apparently not. Perhaps a reading of T. McAlindon's "Shakespeare's Tragic
Cosmos" (Cambridge UP, 1990) would be a good place to begin? Or perhaps the
various mentions of Tillyard found in a simple critical reader like
"Shakespearean Tragedy" ed. John Drakakis in the Longman Critical Readers
series (1992). I am sure that more qualified people can offer far more and
better suggestions.
 
An Sonjae.
Sogang University Seoul Korea
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Burton and Branagh *Hamlet*s

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0369.  Wednesday, 10 May 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Bill Dynes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, May 5, 1995
        Subj:   Richard Burton's _Hamlet_
 
(2)     From:   Elizabeth Blye Schmitt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 5 May 1995 12:33:44 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Hamlets on Film, etc.
 
(3)     From:   Brendan P Murphy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 07 May 95 12:11:32 EDT
        Subj:   Branagh's Hamlet
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Dynes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, May 5, 1995
Subject:        Richard Burton's _Hamlet_
 
I heard only part of an NPR report (Thursday 4 May) that a copy of a film of
Richard Burton's _Hamlet_ has been discovered and shown in London.  Does anyone
know if there are further plans for this film?
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Elizabeth Blye Schmitt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 5 May 1995 12:33:44 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Hamlets on Film, etc.
 
The DALLAS MORNING NEWS today (5/5/95) also ran a wire report from the
HOLLYWOOD REPORTER confirming the Branagh 3.5 hr HAMLET. It also stated that
Oliver Parker will direct OTHELLO with Laurence Fishburne as Othello, Branagh
as Iago and Thurman as Desdemona.
 
"All things considered" on NPR yesterday ran a piece on the 1964 Burton Hamlet
directed by Gielgud. An archive tape has been restored and will be available
for American audiences "sometime this Fall." No mention if this meant a
theatrical release, cable or video.
 
Also, did no one but me catch the A&E BIOGRAPHY episode on HAMLET. Lots of
history, archive clips, talks with directors and actors. A good overview of
performance history.
 
Elizabeth Schmitt
(note new address)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brendan P Murphy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 07 May 95 12:11:32 EDT
Subject:        Branagh's Hamlet
 
I know this may be old news to many SHAKSPEReans, but anyone who wants to know
what Branagh is likely to do with the *Hamlet* film should check out his 1992
full-length BBC Radio Drama recording (Bantam Doubleday Dell Audio Publishing,
ISBN 1 85686 1287, Catalogue No. RC100).
 
On the whole, it is an exceptional recording.  Many of the players are drawn
from Branagh's films -- Judi Dench (Gertrude), Derek Jacobi (Claudius), Richard
Briers (Polonius), and Emma Thompson (Player Queen) - - with such other
notables as John Gielgud (Ghost), the recently-deceased Michael Hordern (Player
King), and Michael Williams (Horatio).
 
On the matter of the text, Branagh used ** Shakespeare: The Complete Works -
Electronic Edition ** from Oxford University Press. Quoting from Russell
Jackson, Fellow of the Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham: "The
text used for the present production is based on the play as it appeared in the
First Folio. ... There are two other significant versions of the
 
play, both of them in the smaller, quarto format: the 'Bad' Quarto of 1603, in
which a short and badly mangled text is given ('To be or not to be, ay there's
the point') and the 'Good' Quarto of 1604.  In the 1604 edition Hamlet has some
passages that do not appear in the First Folio and it is thought by many
scholars that the play had been revised in the course of its career in the
theatre -- possibly by the author himself.  In our script these passages have
been included in order to present the fullest possible version of the play --
among them is the soliloquy 'How all occasions do inform against me'. ...
Although other editions have been consulted, and some of their readings
adopted, the principal source for the text used in this recording is G.R.
Hibbard's edition (Oxford, 1987)."
 
This recording is well worth a listen -- you can bet Branagh will be using it
to help convince wary producers to part with portions of their livelihood.
 
===> Brendan Patrick Murphy (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
        Santa Clara, CA

Qs: Hypermedia Project; *Oth.* Verse

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0370.  Wednesday, 10 May 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Robert Knapp <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 04 May 94 08:18:02 PDT
        Subj:   Hypertext/Hypermedia
 
(2)     From:   Emmanuel Kowalski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 5 May 1995 09:28:56 MET-1DST
        Subj:   A Question about a Verse in Othello
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Knapp <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 04 May 94 08:18:02 PDT
Subject:        Hypertext/Hypermedia
 
Does anyone have information about the current state of the MIT/Stanford
project (under development by Peter Donaldson, Larry Friendlander, and Janet
Murray) that was demonstrated at the Atlanta SAA?
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Emmanuel Kowalski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 5 May 1995 09:28:56 MET-1DST
Subject:        A Question about a Verse in Othello
 
This being my first post, Greetings to all SHAKSPEReans, and especially to
Hardy Cook...
 
In his short story "Pierre Menard, author of Don Quixote", Borges mentions the
following verse found in Othello (near the end of Othello's last long speech,
I'm sorry I don't have a line-number) :
        Where a malignant and a turban'd Turk
which he praises for its strange use of a descriptive and a moral adjective.
 
I was discussing this with a friend recently who thought it was merely
rhetorical, and brought no deeper meaning to the speech. I thought it would be
as good an occasion as any to write a first post to SHAKSPER to ask about it,
so: do you think this particular verse adds to the understanding of Othello,
and how/why? Does it have any special function in the speech? As a  subsidiary
question, talking of Borges: what do Shakespearian scholars/actors/specialists
think of his criticism and allusions to Shakespeare in general? I have in mind
for example a preface he wrote to an edition of "Macbeth" and his short text
"Everything and nothing"  - which appeared in a book called "El Hacedor" in
spanish ("L'Auteur" in french), although I don't know the english title.
 
And, by the way, do you know other instances of this same "zeugmatic" construct
in Shakespeare or other writers? I'm afraid this is already too long for such a
simple query. I hope I haven't taken too much of your time.
 
        Emmanuel Kowalski
        This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

EXTRACT/MAIL

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0368.  Wednesday, 10 May 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Scott Shepherd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 4 May 1995 11:40:03 -0400
        Subj:   Casting the *Othello* movie
 
(2)     From:   David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 4 May 1995 18:50:35 +0100
        Subj:   Othello film
 
(3)     From:   Chris Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 6 May 95 09:27:38 -0500
        Subj:   Uma Thurman/Shakespeare & Co
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Shepherd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 4 May 1995 11:40:03 -0400
Subject:        Casting the *Othello* movie
 
Maximize the age gap: Morgan Freeman and some unknown 14-year-old girl. Up the
apparent scandal of that elopement or Brabantio's outrage comes out sheer
bigotry.
 
For Iago get somebody who always plays good guys. Tom Hanks or somebody (or
Kenneth Branagh maybe).
 
And be sure and find a damn good Emilia...
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 4 May 1995 18:50:35 +0100
Subject:        Othello film
 
Just for the record, and in response to Christine Gilmore, I was not dismissing
the idea of Uma Thurman as Desdemona; I believe my exact words were, "I'll
reserve judgement."  I'm well aware of her work in Dangerous Liasons, and in
fact almost mentioned that in my post, but was just tired of typing at the
time.  I assume she's being cast in this because she's "hot" due to Pulp
Fiction (which I really liked, by the way), but I think she's quite capable of
playing a good Desdemona under the right circumstances.  Whether she actually
will or not is another matter; if she is in fact cast in this movie, I hope she
does a good job.
 
Dave Kathman
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 6 May 95 09:27:38 -0500
Subject:        Uma Thurman/Shakespeare & Co
 
In response to Christine Gilmore's query: I think Uma Thurman is a fine actor;
I just don't see her as Desdemona, primarily because she seems to me so overtly
sexual, and that isn't my image of Desdemona. Julia Ormond I could see,
Michelle Pfeiffer (although some would probably say she's too _old_!!), even
someone a little more intriguing and offbeat, like Lori Petty.
 
And to Timothy Pinnow: I think from my contact with the people at Shakespeare &
Co. that they are extremely responsible about what they are doing. When I
submitted my application, the director of training called me to talk about the
kinds of things they do and whether or not that was something I was interested
in/prepared for, since my background in Shakespeare is primarily academic.
After I convinced _him_ that I was interested, I was accepted into the program.
As someone who has done only a bit of acting, and that long ago, but who has
good friends who are actors (as well as not a few good friends in the mental
health field), I think that confronting one's emotional blocks in a training
program like this can be extremely productive. This is not to say that no risk
is involved, but since most of the Shakespeare & Co staff are trained
professionals in their own fields, and have done a lot of related work in group
dynamics/therapy, I trust them to know what is appropriate in a given
situation. I don't think mental health professionals are the only people
qualified to assist fellow human beings in exploring themselves in new ways.
Obviously, I'll be able to speak to this more specifically once I've completely
the workshop. But based on reading about it, seeing a public tv program about
Tina Packer, and talking with folks who have participated, I'm not concerned at
this point. In fact, I'm anticipating the experience with great excitement.
Sorry for going on so long. --Chris Gordon

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