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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: December ::
Qs: *SQ* Teaching Issue; Abhorson; Slang
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0934.  Friday, 1 December 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Christine Mack Gordon <
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        Date:   Thursday, 30 Nov 95 09:50:23 -0600
        Subj:   SQ
 
(2)     From:   Steven Marx <
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        Date:   Thursday, 30 Nov 1995 08:29:41 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Measure for Measure 4.2.44-48 (fwd)
 
(3)     From:   J.M. Richardson <
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        Date:   Thursday, 30 Nov 1995 14:00:37 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Elizabethan Slang
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Mack Gordon <
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Date:           Thursday, 30 Nov 95 09:50:23 -0600
Subject:        SQ
 
A recent issue of *Shakespeare Quarterly* focussed on teaching; I would like to
acquire a copy of just this single issue. Could someone tell me the most
efficient way to do this; do they have e-mail, perhaps? Thanks in advance.
 
Chris Gordon
University of Minnesota
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steven Marx <
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Date:           Thursday, 30 Nov 1995 08:29:41 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Measure for Measure 4.2.44-48 (fwd)
 
Can anyone help me, and one of my students, to construe the meaning of this
"proof" that Abhorson's occupation as hangman is a mystery?
 
Every true man's apparel fits your thief: if it be too little for your thief,
your true man thinks it big enough; if it be too big for your thief, your thief
thinks it little enough: so every true man's apparel fits your thief.
 
Signet edition footnote says: "interpretation uncertain."
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           J.M. Richardson <
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Date:           Thursday, 30 Nov 1995 14:00:37 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Elizabethan Slang
 
In her article, "Representing Ophelia..." Elaine Showalter argues that in
Elizabethan slang, "nothing" was a term for the female gentitalia, but gives no
Elizabethan source for this, or indeed any specific reference. I can find
nothing in the OED or in Partridge.  Does anyone have a reference that can
establish the validity of this claim?
 
Thanks
J.M. Richardson, Department of English, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ont.
Ontario, P7B 5E1.  jrichard@cs_acad_lan.lakeheadu.ca
 

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