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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: December ::
Re: Abhorson
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0943.  Monday, 4 December 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Jeff Myers <
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        Date:   Monday, 4 Dec 1995 08:10:05 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0939 Re: Abhorson
 
(2)     From:   James Schafer <SCHAEFEJ@GUVAX.BITNET>
        Date:   Monday, 04 Dec 1995 11:13:41 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0934  Re: Abhorson's occupation
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jeff Myers <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 4 Dec 1995 08:10:05 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0939 Re: Abhorson
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0939 Re: Abhorson
 
> Every true man's apparel fits your thief: if it be too little for your thief
> your true man thinks it big enough; if it be too big for your thief, your
> thief thinks it little enough: so every true man's apparel fits your thief.
 
Could these lines possibly refer not to the noose, but to the clothing of the
hanged that the hangman usually receives?  See Falstaff's line in 1HIV about a
hangman's obtaining of suits.
 
Jeff Myers
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Schafer <SCHAEFEJ@GUVAX.BITNET>
Date:           Monday, 04 Dec 1995 11:13:41 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0934  Re: Abhorson's occupation
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0934  Re: Abhorson's occupation
 
G. B. Harrison's note to the lines reads, "i.e., an honest man's clothes suit
the thief who steals them."  Now, I'm still trying to figure out what that has
to do with proving that Abhorson's grisly occupation is a "mystery," a "trade
practiced by a skilled craftsman," as GBH also notes.  Unless there is
something about the one-size- fits-all nature of the hangman's (the "thief's"?)
noose.  Hmmmm: the Roman crucifiers (sorry for an out-of-liturgical-season
reference here!) rolled bones for Christ's robe; did the English hangman get
his victim's clothes?
 
James F. Schaefer Jr.
Georgetown University

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