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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: December ::
Re: *LLL*'s Rosaline
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0952.  Saturday, 9 December 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Cary Mazer <
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        Date:   Thursday, 7 Dec 1995 12:09:59 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0950  Q: *LLL*'s Rosaline
 
(2)     From:   Robert Montgomery <
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        Date:   Thursday, 7 Dec 95 09:48:37 PDT
        Subj:   RE: SHK 6.0950  Q: *LLL*'s Rosaline
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cary Mazer <
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Date:           Thursday, 7 Dec 1995 12:09:59 -0500
Subject: 6.0950  Q: *LLL*'s Rosaline
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0950  Q: *LLL*'s Rosaline
 
>1- Is Rosaline actually black or does she just have black hair and eyes?
>Obviously, she is representative of the dark lady in the sonnets, but is it
>more specific than that?
 
ANSWER:  Are YOU actually black, or do you just have black hair and eyes?
You're playing her, after all.
 
Cary
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Montgomery <
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Date:           Thursday, 7 Dec 95 09:48:37 PDT
Subject: 6.0950  Q: *LLL*'s Rosaline
Comment:        RE: SHK 6.0950  Q: *LLL*'s Rosaline
 
In answer to some of your questions, no Rosaline is not black in skin pigment.
She is dark haired, and at the time the more popular coloring was blond. Here
eyes are dark also. She is not a wanton in behavior. Rather she is adept at
word games and uses her wit to fend off and disconcert Berowne, who claims to
be in love with her. As for O's I don't have time to hunt it up but you'll
undoubtedly find a gloss in any of the major reputable complete editions of
Shakespeare: try the Roverside or Harper, Collins editions or the Arden edition
of LLL. There seems to me to be little objective reason and even less profit in
somehow connecting Rosaline tothe dark lady, who is both black haired and eyed
and a wanton, or at least said to be by the speaker. R.L. Montgomery
 

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