1995

Re: Ian McKellen's *R3*

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0932. Thursday, 30 November 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Laura Blanchard <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 18:47:05 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0926 Ian McKellen's *R3*
 
(2)     From:   Bill Day <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 22:48:47 -0500
        Subj:   Ian McKellen and Richard III
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Laura Blanchard <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 18:47:05 -0500
Subject: 6.0926 Ian McKellen's *R3*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0926 Ian McKellen's *R3*
 
Many thanks to all who responded. Much of this I have already, but I hope to
have more comprehensive materials for our Web site before I link the section to
our homepage.
 
Those of you who would be interested in previewing the section are welcome to
do so at
http://www.webcom.com/blanchrd/mckellen/index.html
 
The usual "under construction" caveats apply, of course -- especially to the
Shakespeare links, which I have been gathering over the past week but have not
yet included. Thanks again.
 
Regards,
Laura Blanchard
Richard III Society
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Day <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 22:48:47 -0500
Subject:        Ian McKellen and Richard III
 
I haven't heard anything about plans to film the production, but I'm surprised
he'd bother.  I saw it at the Kennedy Center in Washington and thought it was a
disaster for reasons that, as I recall, others aired on the list when the play
was in performance.
 
McKellen's choice to portray Richard as a kind of proto-Hitler, Nazi uniforms
and all, both obscured the nature of Richard's personal malevolence and
ambition and undermined the credibility of the performance. Far from exercising
the kind of hypnotic control over the masses that Hitler displayed over the
crowds at Nuremberg, R3's rise to power is largely a matter of the manipulation
of personal alliances and the elimination of people who stand before him in the
succession.  Despite his allegation of the princes' bastardy, Richard does not
really achieve the throne by perpetration of the Big Lie, as Hitler did.
Although there may be some superficial similarity between Hitler's seizure of
power and Richard's, Hitler exercised much greater popular control than Richard
does in the play (witness Buckingham's appeal to the citizen's of London.)
Richard is a tragedy that turns on one man's ambition far more than on an
entire nation's corruption.  I think it is a vulgar error, in the worst sense
of the word, to conflate the Nazi regime with every coup d'etat and dictatorial
regime that springs up.  Cavalier allusion undermines, rather than aiding, the
cause of "relevance."
 
Unfortunately, the effect at the Kennedy Center when I saw R3 was repeated,
though muted, laughter in the audience every time McKellen delivered one of R's
more vicious lines.  Dressing Richard in robes too big for him did neither the
production nor McKellen a service.
 
Sincerely,
Bill Day
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Q: Visual Aids

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0931. Thursday, 30 November 1995.
 
From:           Michael T. Calvert <U30373@UICVM>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Nov 95 17:13:40 CST
Subject:        Shakespeare visual aids
 
Fellow SHAKSPEReans:
 
I am currently looking for Shakespeare slides to illustrate lectures. In
particular, I'm interested in bibliographic images, i.e., title pages and
sample pages of text from both pre- and post-folio publications, plus images of
handwritten documents (such as the possibly Shakespearean scenes from _Sir
Thomas More_).
 
Does anyone know of a publisher or educational media house that sells such
items?  Please reply to me directly at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and I will gladly
digest the responses and post them to the list.
 
TIA
Michael Calvert
Newberry Library

Re: *Shrew*

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0929. Thursday, 30 November 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Jay Johnson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 15:21:51 -0700 (MST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0927  Re: *Shr.*
 
(2)     From:   Bernie Folan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 30 Nov 95 11:36:49 gmt
        Subj:   Kate / Griselda
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jay Johnson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 15:21:51 -0700 (MST)
Subject: 6.0927  Re: *Shr.*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0927  Re: *Shr.*
 
With regard to Kate's final speech in _The Taming of the Shrew_, one very clear
and unironic interpretation is that given by Charles Marowitz.  In his
adaptation, called _The Shrew_, Kate's taming is essentially a Concentration
Camp brainwashing.  Here is the beginning of the final scene:
 
(Lights up on a surreal tribunal setting.  Petruchio sits behind a high
tribunal desk.  He is looking straight ahead in the background, there is the
unmistakeable murmur of women's voices, chatting, gossiping, conniving.  After
a moment Grumio, dressed in a black gown like an official of the Court, bangs
his staff three times.  The wispering stops.
 
Kate is ushered in by Baptista.  She is wearing a simple, shapeless
institutional-like garment.  She stares straight ahead and gives the impression
of being mesmerized.  Her face is white; her hair drawn back, her eyes wide and
blank.)
 
Kate: (Weakly)  What is your will, sir, that you send for me?
 
Petruchio:  Katherine, I charge thee, tell these headstrong women
            What duty they owe to their lords and husbands.
 
(Kate does not reply.  After a moment, Baptista, who is beside her, touches her
shoulder comfortingly.  Eventually, Kate begins to mouthe words.  Obviously,
she has learned this speech by rote and is delivering it as if the words were
being spoken by another.)
 
and so on... Marowitz also has a very interesting version of _The Merchant of
Venice_ set in pre-WW II Palestine. These and other adaptations can be found in
_The Marowitz Shakespeare_ (1978).
 
Cheers,
Jay Johnson
Medicine Hat College
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bernie Folan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 30 Nov 95 11:36:49 gmt
Subject:        Kate / Griselda
 
Lisa Broome wrote:
 
          >>I am working on a paper in which I describe Shakespeare's
          >>Taming of the Shrew as mythic and Dekker's Patient Grissil
          >>as folkloric in mode. .. I would like to know if anyone
          >>has suggestions for additional sources.  I also welcome
          >>any comments on the topic! ..<snip>
 
There is an article by C E Brown comparing Katherina and Griselda in TEXAS
STUDIES IN LITERATURE AND LANGUAGE, Vol 37, No 3 (Fall 1995). Published by
University of Texas Press.
 
          Bernie

Re: Hollywood; Happy *Lr.*; Soliloquies

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0930. Thursday, 30 November 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Leslie Thomson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 19:31:15 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0928  *Ham.* in Hollywood; Bedford Reviews; Job
 
(2)     From:   Jesus Cora <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 17:01:28 UTC+0200
        Subj:   SHK 6.0924  Re: Courts, Merchants, and more
 
(3)     From:   Robert Appelbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 14:45:47 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Soliloquies
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Leslie Thomson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 19:31:15 -0500
Subject: 6.0928  *Ham.* in Hollywood; Bedford Reviews; Job
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0928  *Ham.* in Hollywood; Bedford Reviews; Job
 
A correction: the *Hamlet* piece mentioned by E. Pearlman is in the November 20
issue of the New Yorker.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jesus Cora <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 17:01:28 UTC+0200
Subject: Re: Courts, Merchants, and more
Comment:        SHK 6.0924  Re: Courts, Merchants, and more
 
Oops...
 
I know, I know. My memory did not serve me right as to the Restoration *Lear*
which is not by Dryden and Davenant, but by Nahum Tate as many of you pointed
out. Dryden and Davenant did rewrite a Shakespeare play, though: *The Tempest;
or the Happy Island*. Sorry about this mistake.
 
By the way, are these reworkings of Shakespeare's plays ever performed these
days?
 
Yours.
Jesus Cora
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Appelbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 14:45:47 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Soliloquies
 
A question, maybe an odd question:  We know that early modern Englanders
generally read aloud rather than to themselves.  Is there any evidence that
they may have been more inclined to THINK aloud than we do? Chaucer's *The
Miller's Tale*, some of you will remember, seems to rely on this possibility
when Nicholas exclaims "A berd! A berd!"
 
Incidentally, is it an article of faith that "soliloquy" has to mean talking
*to* oneself?  Can't it also mean talking *by* oneself?
 
Robert Appelbaum
UC Berkeley

*Ham.* in Hollywood; Bedford Reviews; Job

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0928.  Wednesday, 29 Nov. 1995.
 
(1)     From:   E. Pearlman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Nov 1995 11:24:55 -0600 (MDT)
        Subj:   *Ham.* in Hollywood
 
(2)     From:   Jung Jimmy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Nov 95 10:24:00 PST
        Subj:   The Lunatic, The Lover  and The Poet
 
(3)     From:   Kurt Daw <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Nov 95 09:58:35 EST
        Subj:   Position Announcement
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           E. Pearlman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 28 Nov 1995 11:24:55 -0600 (MDT)
Subject:        *Ham.* in Hollywood
 
SHAKSPERians will want to read the very amusing and also sad essay by David
Remnick in the NEW YORKER for Nov. 30 called "Hamlet in Hollywood."  It
features well-known Shakespearians.  But I would suggest that for the full joy
of the experience, people should read or re-read Raymond F. Waddington's essay
"Lutheran Hamlet" in ELN 1989,27-39.
 
E. Pearlman
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jung Jimmy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 28 Nov 95 10:24:00 PST
Subject:        The Lunatic, The Lover  and The Poet
 
I was fishing for reviews of Brian Bedford in The Lunatic, The Lover  and The
Poet.  My mom got a flyer and was trying to decide if she would find it
interesting.
 
jimmy
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kurt Daw <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 28 Nov 95 09:58:35 EST
Subject:        Position Announcement
 
Because of the heavy Shakespearean component of the production aspect of this
job it may be of interest to SHAKSPER members:
 
Faculty Position
Theater Generalist
 
Kennesaw State College, a progressive metropolitan college in the University
System of Georgia, invites applications for a tenure-track position in the
theater program in the Department of Music and Performing Arts.  Located on an
attractive campus northwest of Atlanta, the college enrolls 12,000 students in a
broad array of high quality undergraduate and graduate programs.
 
KSC has established a notable record for the inclusion of minorities and women
in its educational mission and strongly encourages applications from both
groups.
 
Qualifications/Responsibilities: M.F.A. or Doctorate in theater or appropriate
related field.  Faculty member will teach in small department specializing in
contemporary approaches to pre-modern literature in scholarship and production.
Primary responsibilities will be 1) to teach an innovative Introduction to
Theater course in the general education core, and 2) to teach Contemporary
Theater Arts, an introduction to the major and the profession. In addition,
undergraduate teaching expertise in theater history, dramaturgy, and play
analysis is desirable. Experience or demonstrated potential to direct pre-modern
literature (particularly Shakespeare) required.  Position requires strong skills
in undergraduate liberal arts education, ability to work as a team member and
interest in college and community service.  Departmental service commitments
will include extensive support for Classic TheaterWorks, the campus production
company.  Involvement with Classic TheaterWorks publications, public relations
and educational outreach efforts are an integral part of the job. Computer
skills (especially Macintosh) a plus. Rank and salary commensurate with
experience and qualifications.  Position available September 1996.
 
Application Instructions:  Applications will be accepted until position is
filled.  To guarantee consideration, send a letter of application, vita,
official transcripts and three references (names, addresses, telephone numbers)
by February 15, 1996 to : Kurt Daw, Chair, Theater Search Committee, Department
of Music and Performing Arts, Kennesaw State College, 1000 Chastain Road,
Kennesaw, Georgia 30144-5591.  FAX (770) 423-6368.  The committee also welcomes
supporting materials, including examples of teaching materials, demonstrations
of computer skills, production photographs, and scholarly and popular
dramaturgical articles.
 
Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer

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