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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: November ::
Qs: *Hamlet*; *MV*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0869.  Friday, 3 November 1995.
 
(1)     From:   C. David Frankel <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Nov 1995 15:25:06 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Hamlet Query
 
(2)     From:   Kelly Lynne Hyatt <
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        Date:   Thursday, 2 Nov 1995 15:29:20 -0400 (AST)
        Subj:   Re: The Merchant of Venice
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           C. David Frankel <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Nov 1995 15:25:06 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Hamlet Query
 
In the speech to the players Hamlet says ". . .to show Virtue her own feature,
scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and
pressure. . . ."
 
Two questions:  What are the sources for believing that these are traditional
abstractions and that these abstractions have the genders which Hamlet applies
to them?
 
Does anyone know if Virtue, scorn, and the time have been connected with
Ophelia, Gertrude, and Claudius?
 
Thanks.
C. David Frankel

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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kelly Lynne Hyatt <
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Date:           Thursday, 2 Nov 1995 15:29:20 -0400 (AST)
Subject:        Re: The Merchant of Venice
 
To Whom It May Concern,
 
        I am a student at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. During
my Shakespeare class yesterday a discussion was brought forward concerning the
source of Antonio's depression in The Merchant of Venice. Automatically
Antonio's relationship to Bassinio was brought into question. This inquiry led
to a highly spirited debate on whether his feelings were of a homosexual nature
or purely platonical. This debate was only touched on and hardly resolved. I
was just wondering if anyone could give me any further insight into this
question.
 
                                        Thank you,
                                        Kelly Hyatt
 

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