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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: November ::
Re: Hamlets
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0889. Thursday, 10 November 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Peter L Groves <
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        Date:   Friday, 10 Nov 1995 12:37:19 GMT+1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0869  Qs: *Hamlet*
 
(2)     From:   Elizabeth Blye Schmitt <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 8 Nov 1995 18:50:14 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0857 Qs: 15-Min. Ham.
 
(3)     From:   Peter L Groves <
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        Date:   Friday, 10 Nov 1995 12:28:12 GMT+1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0862  Skinhead Ham
 
(4)     From:   Harry Hill <HILHAR@CONU2.BITNET>
        Date:   Thursday, 09 Nov 1995 07:50:05 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Robert LePage's One-Man Hamlet
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter L Groves <
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Date:           Friday, 10 Nov 1995 12:37:19 GMT+1000
Subject: 6.0869  Qs: *Hamlet*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0869  Qs: *Hamlet*
 
> In the speech to the players Hamlet says ". . .to show Virtue her own feature,
> scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and
> pressure. . . ."
> Two questions:  What are the sources for believing that these are traditional
> abstractions and that these abstractions have the genders which Hamlet applies
> to them?
 
I'm afraid the answer is probably less interesting than you suspect. _His_ is
just standard Elizabethan English for _its_;  the two abstract nouns are
probably feminine only because virtually all abstract nouns (like _virtus_ )
are feminine in Latin.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Elizabeth Blye Schmitt <
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Date:           Wednesday, 8 Nov 1995 18:50:14 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 6.0857 Qs: 15-Min. Ham.
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0857 Qs: 15-Min. Ham.
 
During my Senior year at Vassar, I tackled the 15 minute HAMLET. You have no
choice but to be bouncy. We had no set-no time. Simple costumes-white tops,
black pants or skirts and tennis shoes if I remember correctly. ^ 6 actors took
on the play, plus one on the sidelines as Shakespeare ( he did the prologue)
who provided sound effects. The whole thing was rather silly, but very
exhilerating. Tell your student to work sloely and only build the pace once
they've got their lines and blocking down.
 
Elizabeth Schmitt

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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter L Groves <
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 >
Date:           Friday, 10 Nov 1995 12:28:12 GMT+1000
Subject: 6.0862  Skinhead Ham
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0862  Skinhead Ham
 
The Skinhead _Hamlet_ can be found in _The Faber Book of Parodies_, ed. Simon
Brett (London, 1984), ISBN 0-571-13125-5 (or -13254 for the paperback),
pp.316-20.  My favourite scene is 1.3:
 
LAERTES: I'm f*king off now.  Watch Hamlet doesn't slip you one while I'm gone.
OPHELIA: I'll be f*ked if he does.
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <HILHAR@CONU2.BITNET>
Date:           Thursday, 09 Nov 1995 07:50:05 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Robert LePage's One-Man Hamlet
 
Last night I sat in the third row of the Monument National's wonderful and
refurbished old theatre, excited about seeing Robert Lepage's ELSINEUR
[Elsinore], his one-man Hamlet. When the curtain rose to give us several
intriguing slabs that began to move, create coffin-shaped holes in them, movies
of Lepage playing various characters on them, changing colours projected by
laser and other lights up and down them, changing patterns of brick and stone
work, flower and cloud. Through, in, above and below all these effects
crouched, leapt, sat, dangled, and levitated Robert Lepage.
 
I kept thinking of Edward Gordon Craig and how his steps and panels first
affected audiences while the uebermarionnetten of his actors gave the lines
round and about, here and there. In other words, there was so much going and
creaking and thumping on that I simply couldn't concentrate, even though this
Hamlet was in the language of Victor Hugo and therefore called in me for a
certain concentrative intensity.
 
Basically, the thing was no good. He's a good enough actor, if careful and
elegant gestures and nice vocal modulation count, and I think they do. But he
never thrilled, not at all. The evening was, in fact, pretty deadly. Clever but
deadly. The audience was lukewarm at most at intermission; how they reacted at
the end I shall have to learn from reviews, because I was at home in bed by
that time.
 
        Harry Hill
        Montreal
 

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