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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: November ::
Lists Project; Ngaio Marsh; Stratford
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 901. Wednesday, 15
November 1995.

(1)     From:   Michael Swanson <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Nov 1995 13:34:26 -0500
        Subj:   Production Lists Project

(2)     From:   Valerie Gager <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Nov 1995 10:07:00 -0700
        Subj:   Ngaio Marsh

(3)    From:   David Evett <R0870%
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        Date:   Tuesday 14 Nov 1995 14:46 ET
        Subj:   SHK 6.0884  Announcements

(4)     From:   Dan Pigg <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Nov 1995 10:43:45 -600 (CST)
        Subj:   RE: Queer Theory


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Swanson <
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Date:           Tuesday, 14 Nov 1995 13:34:26 -0500
Subject:        Production Lists Project

It's been pointed out to me that my mailing address was not included in
my original request.  Sorry about that.  It is:

Department of Fine Arts
Franklin College
501 E. Monroe St.
Franklin, IN.  46131

Thanks for your help with this survey!

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Valerie Gager <
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Date:           Tuesday, 14 Nov 1995 10:07:00 -0700
Subject:        Ngaio Marsh

Intrigued by the number of different titles suggested for Ngaio Marsh's
book, I checked with my crime-fiction colleague, Joan Stottlemyer, who
explained that some of Marsh's books were published under two different
titles.  Thus, the novel published in the U.S. in 1966 as *Killer
Dolphin* was issued in the U.K.  as *Death at the Dolphin* in 1967.
Does the use of two titles have anything in common with the recent
discussion of differences in acting styles?  For those interested in
Marsh, the Spring 1995 issue of *The Armchair Detective* has an article
by B. J. Rahn in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of her birth on
23 April 1895 (note the coincidence with THE birthday), which includes a
reading list (vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 141-7).  In addition to other
accomplishments already noted by SHAKSPEReans, Marsh was awarded the
Order of the British Empire in 1948 for services to literature and
theatre.

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <R0870%
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Date:           Tuesday 14 Nov 1995 14:46 ET
Subject: Announcements
Comment:        SHK 6.0884  Announcements

Hard for us long-standing Stratford, Ontario festival-goers not to find
it a little ironic that SSF will be hosting the upcoming meeting of the
Shakespeare Theatre Association of America, a group whose "central
activity is the production of Shakespeare's plays," given that the 1996
Stratford season, announced in the same posting, will devote only 3 of
its ll productions to Shakespeare. Here in Cleveland, our Ohio
Shakespeare Festival had the honesty to change its name to the Ohio
Theater Festival when its Shakespeare work dropped to less than half the
total.

Grumpily,
Dave Evett

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dan Pigg <
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Date:           Tuesday, 14 Nov 1995 10:43:45 -600 (CST)
Subject:        RE: Queer Theory

I thought I would add my two cents here, based on some reading and a
recent conference I attended where several of the papers used this
methodology to investigate medieval texts.  When I first saw the term
"queer theory" several years ago in an MLA call for papers, I bristled.
After all, I try to be inclusive of all people and to cast no judgments
on anyone's preferences.  The term "queer" has been reappropriated by
lesbigay people as part of an agenda, but that need not concern us
here.  When applied to literary texts, there are certain basic
assumptions.  First, that the heterosexual world is normative in Western
society is a given, but it is one that is contructed and made
compulsory.  As one looks closer at texts and societies , we see that
there are potentially several sexualities being represented or at least
hovering around the edges of the texts.  The queer often exists at the
site where one cannot make an absolute gendered and heterosexual
identification.  Let me make a wild leap here--not necessarily that I
believe it--but one could label Lady Macbeth in this way as "queer,"
particularly given her own desire for gender switching.  One has merely
to think of _As You Like It_ or _Twelfth Night_ to see such gender
switchings and crosses.  The attempt is to arrest normative patterns of
examining and talking about sexuality.  The attempt is not to
necessarily prove a lesbigay orientation, but to show that normative
heterosexuality is not as fixed we have been taught--at least that is
the import of the theory.  It seems to me that the intent is to
question  relationships of all sorts.  The collection of essays entitled
_Queering the Renaissance_ from Duke UP is perhaps most representative
of the theory to date.  How valuable this new twist will ultimately be
is a good question.  Persoanlly, I think it needs more of an historicist
slant to be valuable in any enduring way.  To date, it seems that those
people who have pursued this particular strategy into print  share
certain markers of sexual orientation with the critical form.  It might
then be perceived as slightly political.    Whether straight people can
do queer theory remains a question in my mind.  It's relation to
feminist criticism is currently a matter of inquiry.  I recall seeing a
title in the Indiana UP listing _More Gender Trouble_ that addresses
this issue particularly.

Just a few thought,
Dan
 

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