1995

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0930. Thursday, 30 November 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Leslie Thomson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 19:31:15 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0928  *Ham.* in Hollywood; Bedford Reviews; Job
 
(2)     From:   Jesus Cora <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 17:01:28 UTC+0200
        Subj:   SHK 6.0924  Re: Courts, Merchants, and more
 
(3)     From:   Robert Appelbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 14:45:47 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Soliloquies
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Leslie Thomson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 19:31:15 -0500
Subject: 6.0928  *Ham.* in Hollywood; Bedford Reviews; Job
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0928  *Ham.* in Hollywood; Bedford Reviews; Job
 
A correction: the *Hamlet* piece mentioned by E. Pearlman is in the November 20
issue of the New Yorker.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jesus Cora <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 17:01:28 UTC+0200
Subject: Re: Courts, Merchants, and more
Comment:        SHK 6.0924  Re: Courts, Merchants, and more
 
Oops...
 
I know, I know. My memory did not serve me right as to the Restoration *Lear*
which is not by Dryden and Davenant, but by Nahum Tate as many of you pointed
out. Dryden and Davenant did rewrite a Shakespeare play, though: *The Tempest;
or the Happy Island*. Sorry about this mistake.
 
By the way, are these reworkings of Shakespeare's plays ever performed these
days?
 
Yours.
Jesus Cora
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Appelbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Nov 1995 14:45:47 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Soliloquies
 
A question, maybe an odd question:  We know that early modern Englanders
generally read aloud rather than to themselves.  Is there any evidence that
they may have been more inclined to THINK aloud than we do? Chaucer's *The
Miller's Tale*, some of you will remember, seems to rely on this possibility
when Nicholas exclaims "A berd! A berd!"
 
Incidentally, is it an article of faith that "soliloquy" has to mean talking
*to* oneself?  Can't it also mean talking *by* oneself?
 
Robert Appelbaum
UC Berkeley

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