1995

Re: RIP Robert Stephens

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 899. Wednesday, 15
November 1995.

(1)     From:   Kate Mazzetti <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Nov 95 11:26:00 PST
        Subj:   RE: SHK 6.0896  RIP Robert Stephens

(2)     From:   Tad Davis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Nov 1995 11:26:09 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0896  RIP Robert Stephens

(3)     From:   John Owen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Nov 95 10:46:01 -0700
        Subj:   RE: SHK 6.0896  RIP Robert Stephens


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kate Mazzetti <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date            Tuesday, 14 Nov 95 11:2 6:00T
Subject: 6.0896  RIP Robert Stephens
Comment:        RE: SHK 6.0896  RIP Robert Stephens

I regret that I did not hear about Robert Stephens' death before
............... What was the cause? Can anyone give me more info? I was
a student at The Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon in 1993
and had the privledge of meeting him and seeing his very inspirational
Lear......

Kate Mazzetti
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tad Davis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Nov 1995 11:26:09 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0896  RIP Robert Stephens
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0896  RIP Robert Stephens

Christine Mack Gordon writes:

> "Banish plump Jack, and banish all the world." RIP Robert Stephens.

This is sad news. I never saw him on stage, but his roles in other media
made a lasting impression:  Pistol in Branagh's "Henry V," Sherlock
Holmes in "The Private Life of,"  and even the voice of Aragorn, son of
Arathorn, in the BBC production of "Lord of the Rings." He was also, if
I remember correctly, the Duke in the Zefferelli film of "Romeo and
Juliet" -- a performance infused with passion and bite, in a role that
is too often a perfunctory gloss.

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Owen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Nov 95 10:46:01 -0700
Subject: 6.0896  RIP Robert Stephens
Comment:        RE: SHK 6.0896  RIP Robert Stephens

I notice Sir Robert's passing with particular sadness.  As a boy, my
primary access to Shakespeare in performance was through recordings,
borrowed from whatever library I could reach.  Hence, Sir Robert's many
recordings made him the first model I encountered of many roles.  Though
we see him hovering about the fringes of movies like Cleopatra, A Taste
of Honey, etc. (what an odd film career he had!), it is on these old
records that his talents were most diligently preserved:

A superb Benedick in Much Ado, with his trademark mixture of
vulnerability and jollity at maximum value. (RCA Victor)
A very bitter and intense Claudio in the same play (Caedmon)
Your standard, unsatisfying Edgar in King Lear (has anyone ever done
this part well?) (Caedmon)
Whining and petulant as Roderigo in Othello (Caedmon)
And a predictable Parolles in All's Well (Caedmon)

A strange legacy for The Royal Hunt of Sun's show-stopping Atahualpa to
leave.  But there is also a Richard III (Caedmon again), so repulsive in
its croaking, tortued rant that it achieves the improbable feat of being
charmlessly magnetic.  A  misfired Pistol for Branagh (does anyone
really care about the sensitive side of Falstaff's ensign?) but well
performed within the limits of the miscalculation.  The last recording I
have is the sneering, brutal Cornwall in Gielgud's Lear.

I wish his Falstaff were available in its entirety -- it must have been
excellent.  Has anyone seen?

John Owen

Qs: Production Lists Project; *Shr.* Irony

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0898.  Tuesday, 14 November 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Michael Swanson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 13 Nov 1995 21:29:34 -0500
        Subj:   Production Lists Project
 
(2)     From:   Bernie Folan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Nov 95 16:12:00 gmt
        Subj:   Irony at close of The Taming of the Shrew
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Swanson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Nov 1995 21:29:34 -0500
Subject:        Production Lists Project
 
Please excuse cross-posting, as well as the length of this message.
 
Dear Colleagues,
 
I am writing to ask your help with a research project that I believe could be
of substantial service to the American educational theatre community, and
indeed to the theatre community as a whole.  Please take a few minutes to read
my request and to respond by mailing back the enclosed card.
 
From the late 1940s through the mid-1970s, various theatre scholars directed a
survey of college and university theatre productions known as the Production
Lists Project.  Under the auspices of the old American Educational Theatre
Association and American Theatre Association, lists of plays produced were
annually collected, arranged into useful lists (i.e., ranking the most produced
plays, musicals, playwrights, and one-acts), and printed in the Educational
Theatre Journal  (now Theatre Journal ).  The project last saw publication in
1976.
 
A paper given by Rick Jones at the 1994 Association for Theatre in Higher
Education (ATHE) conference on the subject of theatre production seasons
inspired me to consider compiling the titles of college and university plays
produced, so as to provide the field with a much better picture of educational
theatre production in the United States than is now available.  Are colleges
and universities producing more recent or original plays than in the past, as
some have suggested in recent years?  Are there fewer Shakespearean
productions?  More Moli=E8re or Marivaux?  Fewer musicals?  More plays by
people of color or by women?  Only such a survey can truly give us such
information, which might also allow us to develop a better overall picture of
national educational theatre production trends. My hope is that the production
information, which will be compiled with the File Maker Pro software program,
might eventually be made available to researchers and to members of the field
through journal publication and through Internet access to the database.
 
To begin this project, my home institution, Franklin College, has awarded me a
grant to fund the initial setup of and the first year's operating costs for
such a project.  At its April 1995 meeting, the ATHE Board of Governors stated
its support for the concept of such a study, in terms of its potential
usefulness to the field.  The next step is up to you.  Please send me a list of
the plays your United States university, college, or conservatory theatre
program produced in the 1994 - 95 academic season, including the summer of
1995.  Mailing me a season brochure by surface mail, if it's still an accurate
record of your season, is a perfectly appropriate way to submit these titles.
Please indicate whether any of these plays were musicals, one-acts, original
works, or plays by people of color or by women.  If you send by e-mail, I will
acknowledge receipt of the information.  If things go well, you will receive a
similar request, by e-mail, next and subsequent summers.
 
Thanks for the time you've taken to read this, and, I hope, to respond to my
request.  I look forward to hearing from you, and to eventually providing you
with a better picture of American educational theatre production than has been
available to us since 1976 .
 
Yours truly,
Michael Swanson
Chair, Fine Arts Department
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bernie Folan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Nov 95 16:12:00 gmt
Subject:        Irony at close of The Taming of the Shrew
 
I am working on how to approach the following question - How ironical is
Katherine's last speech in relation to the play as a whole?
 
My problem is that I'm not quite sure whether I should read this as
 
1) Does K mean what she says about the qualities of a good wife or is she being
ironic? or
 
2) How ironical this final speech is in that it marks a complete change in her
attitudes from the start of the play.
 
Is Katherine a changed woman or is she a newly aware woman giving tips to the
new wives she is speaking to?  Is the irony in her change or in her realising
what the change *should* be for a wife?
 
When I studied the play the fact that Katherine had changed into a submissive
wife was a given - I'm not now sure that she has.  Perhaps she's just learned
what she needs to do to be a "good" wife (as learned in the sun/moon scene).  I
don't want any answers - I'm quite happy to do that part. Just ideas on the
source of the irony being questioned to help me with my approach.
 
Bernie Folan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

RIP Robert Stephens

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0896.  Tuesday, 14 November 1995.
 
From:           Christine Mack Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Nov 95 08:51:02 -0600
Subject:        RIP Robert Stephens
 
"Banish plump Jack, and banish all the world." RIP Robert Stephens.

Re: Curse; Grad Conference; Ngaio Marsh; Queer Theory

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0897.  Tuesday, 14 November 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Jung Jimmy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 13 Nov 95 16:38:00 PST
        Subj:   Re: Curse
 
(2)     From:   William Proctor Williams This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
        Date:   Monday, 13 Nov 95 18:19 CST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0894  Re: Grad Conference
 
(3)     From:   C. David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 13 Nov 1995 18:31:31 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Ngaio Marsh
 
(4)     From:   Robert Dennis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Nov 1995 08:17:56 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0895  Queer Theory
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jung Jimmy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Nov 95 16:38:00 PST
Subject:        Re: Curse
 
In response to Stephen J. Gagen and Rick Robinson; a Washington Post article 2
or 3 Sundays ago revisited the curse of the Scottish play in the aftermath of a
recent production and could report nothing sinister.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Proctor Williams This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Date:           Monday, 13 Nov 95 18:19 CST
Subject: 6.0894  Re: Grad Conference
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0894  Re: Grad Conference
 
Sorry about that, I was just posting a file sent to me by a grad. student. The
conference is 28-30 March 1996.  Write to the address in the announcement about
further details.
 
WPW
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           C. David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Nov 1995 18:31:31 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Ngaio Marsh
 
[This was forwarded by C. David Frankel from the THEATRE list. --HMC]
 
Ngaio Marsh was also a fine theatre director, both in London and in her native
New Zealand. She founded the Canterbury University Drama Dept. in Christchurch,
NZ, training some good people for the London stage as as locally. She was also
a very insightful performance reviewer -- I was on the receiving end a couple
of times -- and was much in demand for NZ radio and TV.  I've never forgotten
her Twelfth Night production which she wrote up in an early issue of
Shakespeare Survey.  It's nice to do homage to a famous lady who also wrote
great detective novels.
 
Margaret Loftus Ranald.
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Dennis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Nov 1995 08:17:56 -0500
Subject: 6.0895  Queer Theory
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0895  Queer Theory
 
For Robert Applebaum, particularly:
 
I did not submit my question about queer theory with "bitter 'ressentiment'".
I am honestly unfamiliar with the term and sought either verification that it
was what it sounded like vernacularly, i.e., the theory of queers, or
clarification of a possibly specialized terminology.  Since only Stuart Rice's
clarification has come forth, I assume "queer theory" indeed deals with
homosexuality.  Just because I consider something like "queer theory" to be a
rather crude expression for academic language, why, Mr. Applebaum, attribute
bitterness to me?  I would feel similarly about an area of study designated
"cripple theory", or any of a dozen other slang expressions.  Scholars should
be able to come up with a term which is both more accurate and more
appropriate, since the adjective "queer" is more emotionally tagged than it is
precise, and you don't even want to begin worrying with the uncertainties in
its use as a noun.
 
I appreciate your several suggestions for following up on gender studies and
gender criticism.  I might suggest advocates and explorers of gender studies
also read _Eve's Rib_ by Robert Poole.  BTW, you did achieve the "thickly"
which you sought.
 
Sincerely,
Bob Dennis
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Sorry; Queer Theory; Bloom; Marriage; Race; Prince

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0895.  Monday, 13 November 1995.
 
(1)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 10 Nov 1995 16:19:23 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0885  Sorry: No apology Needed
 
(2)     From:   Robert Appelbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 10 Nov 1995 13:38:18 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Queer theory
 
(3)     From:   Nina Rulon-Miller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 10 Nov 95 21:47:42 EDT
        Subj:   Bloom on Shakespeare at Princeton
 
(4)     From:   Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 11 Nov 1995 07:16:40 -0600
        Subj:   virginity/potency proofs
 
(5)     From:   Bernie Folan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 13 Nov 95 11:27:41 gmt
        Subj:   Re: Othello and Ethnicity
 
(6)     From:   Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 13 Nov 1995 13:36:59 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   The Prince's Choice
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 10 Nov 1995 16:19:23 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0885  Sorry: No apology Needed
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0885  Sorry: No apology Needed
 
o need for any apologies from Hardy or Tom about the mistaken posting.  At
least, you don't have to apologize to me. I take amusement from this kind of
mistaken posting.  Some years ago, on RENAIS-L, a mistaken invitation to lunch
was sent to the entire list.  Many of us joined in the fun -- requesting where
we should meet, suggesting restaurants all over the world, and so on. Of
course, some of the more serious folks objected to this frivolity and quit the
list.
 
It's certainly worth a try, he said with a wink.
 
Yours,  Bill Godshalk
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Appelbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 10 Nov 1995 13:38:18 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Queer theory
 
Waiting for Mihoko Suzuki to defend herself against the bitter *ressentiment*
expressed in the query about queer theory and gender studies, I've kept silent.
 But since Professor Suzuki doesn't respond, and Stuart Rice's response, though
accurate, was somewhat thin, I would like to say, somewhat thickly, that you
will find the field of "gender studies," and its relation to feminism and queer
theory, mapped out in Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, "Gender Criticism," in *Redrawing
the Boundaries,* ed. Stephen Greenblatt and Giles Gunn (New York: MLA, 1992).
Sedgwick notes that "gender criticism" hovers between feminist studies and
queer studies.  It is not, in Sedgwick's assessment, a discipline or a school
of thought so much as it is a way of interrogating things like disciplines and
schools of thought.  "'Gender criticism,'" she writes "might ... be taken to
mean ... not criticism *through* the categories of gender analysis but
criticism *of* them, the mapping of the fractal borderlines between gender and
its others." (p. 273)
 
The main theoretician of gender studies today, besides Sedgwick herself, is
probably Judith Butler.  Among Renaissance scholars, prominent voices include
Jonathan Goldberg.  In the spirit of its interrogative mission, the main
question of gender criticism might well be, as Sedgwick says, "What *isn't*
gender?"
 
Robert Appelbaum
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nina Rulon-Miller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 10 Nov 95 21:47:42 EDT
Subject:        Bloom on Shakespeare at Princeton
 
For those of you who can live near Princeton, NJ: The Tanner Lectures on Human
Values at Princeton U. this year are 11/15 "Shakespeare and the Value of
Personality," Harold Bloom; Discussants Robert Brustein and Stephen Greenblatt;
11/16 Bloom: Shakespeare and the Value of Love; Discussants, Stanley Cavell and
Lisa Jardine. Both are at 4:30 in McCosh 50.
 
Nina Rulon-Miller
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 11 Nov 1995 07:16:40 -0600
Subject:        virginity/potency proofs
 
Michael Saenger writes: "In the Renaissance, the consummation of a marriage
would often be "announced" by hanging the blood-spotted sheets for a village to
see." What do folks know of English non-literary records of this and other such
practices?
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bernie Folan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Nov 95 11:27:41 gmt
Subject:        Re: Othello and Ethnicity
 
Another useful source is an essay in the novelist Caryl Philips' "The European
Tribe" which is written on his stay in Venice.   Very interesting thoughts on
Venice and the otherness of Othello in Venice.
 
          Bernie Folan
 
(6)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Nov 1995 13:36:59 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        The Prince's Choice
 
The compact disk with Prince Charles' favourite British actors, and his royal
self doing a perfectly credible and creditable Prince Hal as well as the late
Sir Robert Stephens playing Falstaff was in the U.K.last week, and is entitled
*The Prince's Choice*, and was produced specifically to irritate Terence
Hawkes. Sir Robert is not even the only theatrical knight on the disk. There'a
Dame Judy Dench, I believe, and Sir John Gielgud. Mind you, Terence Hawkes must
be annoyed that is there a CD of Shakespeare at all, I should imagine. One
wonders when he last heard any of the words.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.