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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: October ::
Re: Cds; Scenes; owe/own; *MND*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0744.  Monday, 2 October 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Jim Helfers <ATJPH@ASUACAD.BITNET>
        Date:   Saturday, 30 Sep 1995 08:48:52 -0700 (MST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0719  Qs: CD ROMs
 
(2)     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Saturday, 30 Sep 1995 13:34:43 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0737 Re: French/English Scenes
 
(3)     From:   Susan Mather <
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        Date:   Saturday, 30 Sep 1995 18:24:05 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   [owe/own]
 
(4)     From:   Susan Mather <
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        Date:   Saturday, 30 Sep 1995 18:48:28 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0706  Re: *AYL*; *WT*; Tennyson
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jim Helfers <ATJPH@ASUACAD.BITNET>
Date:           Saturday, 30 Sep 1995 08:48:52 -0700 (MST)
Subject: 6.0719  Qs: CD ROMs
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0719  Qs: CD ROMs
 
In answer to Peter Herman's 9/25 question on CD-ROM Shakespeare material --
 
I've generally been underwhelmed and sometimes disappointed by the CD's I've
used and seen concerning Shakespeare.  I'll admit that I'm an IBM guy, and
don't have access to what are probably the best CD things on Shakespeare. I've
heard, for example, that "Shakespeare's Life and Times," available, I think,
from Intellimation, is something good in Mac format.
 
On to what I've used.  My best success has been with World Library's
"Shakespeare Study Guide," which is most useful as an electronic concordance to
words and phrases (by the way, I feel that the most interesting current usage
of computerized materials deals with this referencing, hypertextual function).
I do, however, have a problem, in that it's hard to figure out just where the
developers got their texts for the electronic versions.  Few bother to put
editorial information on their products.
 
I've also picked up the "Shakespeare's London" from Clearvue/eav.  Since it
cost twice as much as the "Shakespeare Study Guide," I was expecting more
sophistication.  Instead, its presentation of Shakespeare information is
primarily visual -- there are plenty of pictures, but little concrete
information on what London was like in the late 16th and early 17th century.
Into the bargain, the company has filled the disk with lots of miscellaneous
(and extraneous) information -- audio bites of Chaucer in old English, U.S.
government documents, and ads for their other products.
 
I too would be interested in hearing what folks have been doing with specific
CD-ROMS at the college/university level.
 
--Jim Helfers
  Grand Canyon University
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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 >
Date:           Saturday, 30 Sep 1995 13:34:43 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 6.0737 Re: French/English Scenes
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0737 Re: French/English Scenes
 
Just to complicate the French/English scene division question a bit, does
anyone think that English (bare stage to bare stage) scenes are new in
Shakespeare's time?
 
I was just reading Gammer Gurton's Needle, where the stage is only emptied
between acts.  At least some of the characters seem to stay on stage between
each scene.  That said, the entrance of a new character doesn't always herald a
new scene, at least not in the edition I'm using.
 
Cheers,
Sean.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susan Mather <
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 >
Date:           Saturday, 30 Sep 1995 18:24:05 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        [owe/own]
 
W.L. Godshalk,
 
In what source did you find this reference to owe/own?  I find this very
interesting--especially about pre-feudal society.  I tried this previous summer
to read up on English history but, I'm afraid that with having to work at
Walgreens drugstoreand dealing with 90 degree temps. and no air conditioning--I
did not get very far.
                                Let me know where I can start,
                                Susan>
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susan Mather <
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 >
Date:           Saturday, 30 Sep 1995 18:48:28 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 6.0706  Re: *AYL*; *WT*; Tennyson
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0706  Re: *AYL*; *WT*; Tennyson
 
I realize I am getting in on this late but, this reminded me of a performance I
saw of Midsummer Night's Dream in Stratford, ONT.  The production was set in
1993.  On stage there was a tree/phallic symbol as well as a rock/female
genitalia.  My group was told of this beforehand--I guess to allay the
shockwaves.  Even so, there were somewho responded to the director's concept as
pretty much blasphemy--he had distorted Shakespeare's concept when he wrote
this drama, etc., etc.  I'm sure you have heard this and much more.  But, all I
can say is I think it is really a smoke screen--the director kept my group
interested, why did they stay through the performance?  Further--with you,
Sarah, I want to know how one could just say the words without sounding like
the science teacher (I think it's science) on  "The Wonder Years."  But then
again--I guess that's still conceptualizing Shakespeare--although as being very
dull.                   Thanks for listening!>
 

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