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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: October ::
Re: Self-conscious Irony
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0750.  Wednesday, 4 October 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Ken Steele <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 3 Oct 95 03:25:27 UT
        Subj:   RE: SHK 6.0747  Self-conscious Irony
 
(2)     From:   Gabriel Egan <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 3 Oct 1995 20:46:41 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0747  Self-conscious Irony
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ken Steele <
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Date:           Tuesday, 3 Oct 95 03:25:27 UT
Subject: 6.0747  Self-conscious Irony
Comment:        RE: SHK 6.0747  Self-conscious Irony
 
John McClain will find hundreds of articles and not a few books on the subject
of "Metatheatricality" in Shakespeare and his contemporaries.  Many in this
discussion group will have more up-to-date bibliographies than I.
 
Ken Steele
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <
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Date:           Tuesday, 3 Oct 1995 20:46:41 +0100
Subject: 6.0747  Self-conscious Irony
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0747  Self-conscious Irony
 
John McClain asks
 
>I'd like to know of any recent studies that explore this [self-reflexivity in
>characters speaking of themselves as players] aspect of
>Shakespeare's drama and poetry.
 
Anne Righter (now Barton) _Shakespeare and the Idea of the Play_ (London:
Penguin, 1962) presents an argument for increasingly sophisticated and
increasingly self-conscious self-referentiality in English drama from the
medieval Mysteries and Moralities through to the Caroline period, with
Shakespeare (of course) as the most outstanding exponent. If I recall she
thinks it became something of tired cliche towards the end.
 
This doesn't qualify as a recent study, however.
 
Gabriel Egan
 

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