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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: October ::
Q: Jonson/Jones Feud; Reading Q (w/ MV Comments); MV
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0778.  Thursday, 12 October 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Michael Field <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 11 Oct 1995 11:33:27 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Jonson & Jones
 
(2)     From:   Kay Pilzer <PILZERKL@VUCTRVAX>
        Date:   Wednesday, 11 Oct 1995 20:25:57 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Decorum and Delight
 
(3)     From:   <
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        Date:   Thursday, 12 Oct 1995 03:05:21 -0400
        Subj:   Merchant of Venice
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Field <
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Date:           Wednesday, 11 Oct 1995 11:33:27 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Jonson & Jones
 
I am interested in the infamous feud between Ben Jonson and Inigo Jones and
wonder if any SHAKSPERians can recommend books--including, possibly, novels or
other works of fiction--that might throw additional light on this subject.
Thanks, as always, for your help in this matter.
 
Mike Field
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kay Pilzer <PILZERKL@VUCTRVAX>
Date:           Wednesday, 11 Oct 1995 20:25:57 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Decorum and Delight
 
My thanks to Bill Godshalk (I've blipped the message already, so I shall spell
your name creatively) and Naomi Liebler for demonstrating that academic sorts
are real people--prick us and we bleed, too.
 
As a lurker on SHAKSPER for the past year, I've enjoyed watching the ebbs and
energies of so many different sorts of discussions.  As a graduate student, I
have been comforted by exhibitions of folly and inspired by exhibitions of
wisdom.  This latest exchange puzzles me:  this Bill person doesn't seem like a
monster, and I often have read his postings with interest and edification.
Could there be a context problem for the statement Naomi responded to?
 
*MV* depends on anti-semitism in the way that, well, all of Shakespeare's stuff
seems to depend on misogyny.  It seems to me that our job, then, is to see how
these plays negotiate and exploit--and often negate--the assumptions on which
they're built.  In that sense, then, anti-semitism or misogyny or imperialism
or racism or tyranny all are, in a real sense, in the eyes of us beholders.
 
And, since I've finally summoned the courage to post to the list:  I'm in the
process of designing my reading list for exams--and thanks to so many of you
who have already contributed to it.  So:  I have a sort of desert-isle
question:
 
If you could recommend only ONE book to a graduate student to read as a
supplement to her work on Shakespeare and the Early Modern Period, what would
it be?
 
I look forward to your suggestions
 
Kay Pilzer
Vanderbilt University (
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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           <
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Date:           Thursday, 12 Oct 1995 03:05:21 -0400
Subject:        Merchant of Venice
 
With all the intense feelings on this subject, I hesitate to enter the fray,
but I have a need, so here goes.
 
I am a playwright. I spent the last year in a workshop sponsored by the Mark
Taper Forum here in Los Angeles. I have written a sequel to the Merchant of
Venice and would like to get some informed feedback on the script from people
who know and love Shakespeare. Please do not ask to see the script if you
aren't actually going to take the time to read it and get back to me soon. I've
had more than enough of that kind of thing.
 
A workshop production, where I could get the play on its feet in front on an
audience would really be great, for all you courageous drama professors out
there.
 
A breif synopsis: The play opens with the arrival of Daniel and Jessica at
Belmont. Daniel is the son of Jessica and Lorenzo, and is ignorant of his
Jewish blood, Jessica having chosen to hide it from him and the family staying
away from Venice all this time. Then Tubal arrives at Belmont to annouce
Shylock's death. He is trying to get word to Jessica through Portia, the only
way he knows of to reach her. So, the truth having come out, Daniel embarks on
an identity quest which in effect reverses the "conversion" of Shylock and
renews the Christian's conflict with him through his grandson. Finally, yes, I
am aware of the A.R. Gurney sequel that opened this summer at the Old Globe. I
saw it, and I've corresponded with Mr. Gurney. My sequel has nothing to do with
his, the two plays are nothing alike. I'm looking for feedback on my play, not
his. Thank you very much.
 

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