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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: October ::
Re: CD *Rom.*; Marlowe Novels; Laughter in *Mac.*;
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0780.  Thursday, 12 October 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Alan Young <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 11 Oct 1995 14:49:24 AST4ADT
        Subj:   CD-Rom ROMEO AND JULIET
 
(2)     From:   Douglas Abel <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 11 Oct 1995 13:10:31 -0700 (MST)
        Subj:   Marlowe Novels
 
(3)     From:   Stacy Keach <
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        Date:   Thursday, 12 Oct 1995 00:23:48 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0760 Q: Laughter in *Mac.*
 
(4)     From:   Nael Dennaoui <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 11 Oct 1995 12:16:38 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0772 Re: Rosalind
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alan Young <
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Date:           Wednesday, 11 Oct 1995 14:49:24 AST4ADT
Subject:        CD-Rom ROMEO AND JULIET
 
Those interested in the CD-ROM edition of ROMEO AND JULIET may be interested to
know that a very favourable review by Ruth Halpern recently appeared in the
magazine CD-ROM TODAY (Oct 1995), p. 79. The price quoted for this Windows
product is $49 (U.S.). The U.S. telephone number for Attica Cybernetics is
(818) 882-9184. I ordered a copy using this number earlier today.
 
Alan Young (
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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas Abel <
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Date:           Wednesday, 11 Oct 1995 13:10:31 -0700 (MST)
Subject:        Marlowe Novels
 
Rather late for this response.  Neverthless--
 
Three other "novelistic" treatments of Marlowe's life:
 
Hugh Ross Williamson, --Kind Kit:  an Informal Biography of Christopher Marlowe
(London:  Michael Joseph, 1972)
 
Philip Henderson, --And Morning in his Eyes:  a Book about Christopher Marlowe
(London:  Boriswood, 1937).
 
A wonderful novel called --To Be a King--.  Unfortunately I have misplaced the
author's name and publishing information.
 
And for a blatant bit of self-promotion, there is the one-person play about
Christopher Marlowe, --To Ride in Triumph--, by me.  It's available from
 
        Playwrights Union of Canada
        54 Wolseley St., 2nd Floor,
        Toronto, ON
        Canada
        M5T 1A5
        phone (416) 947-0201 or 1-800- 561-3318
        FAX (403) 947-0159
 
   Douglas Abel
   Keyano College
   Fort McMurray, Alberta
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stacy Keach <
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Date:           Thursday, 12 Oct 1995 00:23:48 -0400
Subject: 6.0760 Q: Laughter in *Mac.*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0760 Q: Laughter in *Mac.*
 
Dear Jimmy
 
Thank you for your comment re:  the Banquet scene in MACBETH. Nervous laughter
is certainly appropriate, I feel, when the host is convinced he sees someone
(in this case, Banquo's ghost) and the other guests do not.  If the production
you are referring to is the Keach Macbeth in Washington, I can tell you that
the moment when Macbeth ascends the table is in fact an homage to the late
Laurence Olivier, whose Macbeth was heralded by the British critic Kenneth
Tynan as one of the most daring and original of its time.
 
Stunned silence in awkward situations oftentimes gives rise to nervous
laughter, which, I feel, in no way diminshes the personal horror of the main
character.
 
Mac
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nael Dennaoui <
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Date:           Wednesday, 11 Oct 1995 12:16:38 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 6.0772 Re: Rosalind
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0772 Re: Rosalind
 
I'll definitely let you know what I find out about Rosalind,  I have this paper
on it due in a month and I have to come up with some brilliant idea for me to
receive my M.A.  What I've noticed about AYLI, is that Rosalind seems to be to
similiar to portia in the way that both of these characters lead the plot as
well as the men.  They are in control; they take and choose as they please  and
really move the whole plot.  Much like Eve took what she pleased; the forbidden
fruit that she wasn't supposed to have.
 
I don't know, this is just to get you thinking, I'm not as knowledgable as I
would like to be in Shakespeare, my emphasis is in American Lit but this is
what I've come up with so far.  Any thoughts?>
 

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