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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: October ::
Re: Recommended and Recreational Reading
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0786.  Sunday, 15 October 1995.
 
(1)     From:   David Jackson <
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        Date:   Friday, 13 Oct 95 10:02:50 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0782  Re: Suggested Readings
 
(2)     From:   Peter Herman <
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        Date:   Friday, 13 Oct 1995 15:51:11 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0782 Re: Suggested Readings
 
(3)     From:   Gavin H Witt <
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        Date:   Saturday, 14 Oct 95 0:20:20 CDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0782 Re: Suggested Readings
 
(4)     From:   Chris Gordon <
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        Date:   Saturday, 14 Oct 95 17:04:30 -0500
        Subj:   Recreational Reading
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Jackson <
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Date:           Friday, 13 Oct 95 10:02:50 EST
Subject: 6.0782  Re: Suggested Readings
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0782  Re: Suggested Readings
 
From a production point of view, if the already suggested works have been read,
I would suggest Charles Marowitz's "Recycling Shakespeare", which may raise the
hackles of some, but he always has interesting insights, he is pragmatic, and
he doesn't suffer fools gladly. As a supplement, I would add Peter Brook's
Shakespeare materials in "The Shifting Point".
 
Of course, everyone has his/her favorite, and it will be interesting to see how
many (if any) people suggest the same book.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Herman <
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Date:           Friday, 13 Oct 1995 15:51:11 -0400
Subject: 6.0782 Re: Suggested Readings
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0782 Re: Suggested Readings
 
My nomination would be Stephen Greenblatt's _Renaissance Self-Fashioning_. More
than ten years after its initial publication, it's still the most suggestive,
and certainly among if _the_ best written, critical book I've read.
 
Peter C. Herman
Dept. of English
Georgia State University
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gavin H Witt <
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Date:           Saturday, 14 Oct 95 0:20:20 CDT
Subject: 6.0782 Re: Suggested Readings
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0782 Re: Suggested Readings
 
For a single book to open up a study of Shakespeare's plays, I have found John
Barton's _Playing Shakespeare_ to be a bible when considering issues of
performance.  Even better if you can get your hands on the accompanying videos.
 
It is scholarly without being academic, historical but incidentally so; not for
a theoretical or literary critical reading necessarily, but truly indispensable
if you need access to issues of how the texts are brought to life on a stage.
Including some generally useful guides to close reading of the plays.
 
Just a thought from a different angle..
 
Gavin Witt
University of Chicago

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(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Gordon <
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Date:           Saturday, 14 Oct 95 17:04:30 -0500
Subject:        Recreational Reading
 
For those Shakespeareans who enjoyed Stephanie Cowell's first novel, *Nicholas
Cooke* (which centered on a man who is a member of Shakespeare's company), the
second volume (it's designed as a trilogy), *Physician of London,* is being
published by Norton in November. I found a copy in a bookstore today, however,
and wish I had time to read it right now. Stephanie will also be reading from
the novel in NYC in November.
 
Chris Gordon
 

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