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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: October ::
Qs: Sonnet Society; Neo-Latin Trivia
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0814.  Thursday, 19 October 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Georgianna Ziegler <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 18 Oct 95 15:40:00 PDT
        Subj:   Sonnet Society
 
(2)     From:   Timothy Billings <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 18 Oct 1995 23:44:03 -0400
        Subj:   neo-latin trivia
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Georgianna Ziegler <
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Date:           Wednesday, 18 Oct 95 15:40:00 PDT
Subject:        Sonnet Society
 
Have any of you Shaksperians out there in cyberspace ever heard of a "Sonnet
Society" or even a "Shakespeare Sonnet Society"?  This question came over my
desk today (one of many such from Jane Q. Public) and proved a real stumper. I
may be missing something, but I've never heard of one.  Any information will be
gratefully received.  You may reply to me or to the List.
 
Thanks!
Georgianna Ziegler

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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Timothy Billings <
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Date:           Wednesday, 18 Oct 1995 23:44:03 -0400
Subject:        neo-latin trivia
 
I've cudgel'd my brains out about it and now come crawling for help.
 
     O Hominum mores, O gens, O Tempora dura,
     Quantus in urbe Dolor; Quantus in Orbe Dolus!
 
Not strickly a Shakespeare question, I apologize, but in an article I have
drafted on Latin, Dress, and Gender chiefly in *Merry Wives of Windsor* and the
*Hic Mvlier* debate, I am stuck on this couplet attributed only "the Poet" (in
*Haec Vir*).  So I lean on your collective learning.  I have spun the IBYCUS
dizzy.  It is not classical.  Of course it alludes to Cicero. But does that
help?  Henderson and McManus do not gloss it, nor does anyone else, to my
knowledge, who has written on it (not a few).  Any leads will be repaid with
professional courtesy and obscene fawning.
 
Abjectly, hopefully,
Timothy Billings
 

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