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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: October ::
Productions: African *Mac.*; *Mac.*; *TN*; *MND*;
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0836.  Tuesday, 24 October 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Stephen Buhler <
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        Date:   Monday, 23 Oct 1995 09:30:58 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: "African *Macbeth*"
 
(2)     From:   Albert Misseldine <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 24 Oct 1995 13:26:14 -0400
        Subj:   Macbeth Production
 
(3)     From:   Michael A. Norman <
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        Date:   Monday, 23 Oct 1995 14:46:24 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Twelfth Night film
 
(4)     From:   Mary Jane Miller <
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        Date:   Monday, 23 Oct 1995 12:54:20 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0828  Re: *MND* Productions
 
(5)     From:   Gabriel Egan <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 24 Oct 1995 19:10:00 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0802 *Tmp*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen Buhler <
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Date:           Monday, 23 Oct 1995 09:30:58 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Re: "African *Macbeth*"
 
Cynthia Dessen can rightly refer to her Prophetic Soul: I've just learned that
the Haworth Shakespeare Festival has cancelled its scheduled performances of
*Macbeth* and *Romeo and Juliet* here in Lincoln.  The director of our
performing arts center received word that the entire tour is off.  Can anyone
on SHAKSPER confirm this?
 
Regretfully,
Stephen Buhler
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Albert Misseldine <
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Date:           Tuesday, 24 Oct 1995 13:26:14 -0400
Subject:        Macbeth Production
 
Our theater department is planning an April 'Macbeth' production. I'm the
advisor to the producer, and I need this network's help. Specifically, I want
to hear what works best for the scene with Banquo's ghost. I presently favor an
imaginary ghost, with Macbeth 'seeing' what all others on stage do not. From
the stage directions, however, it seems Shakespeare meant it to be done the
other way, with a visible ghost which everyone else on stage has to pretend to
not see. I've seen productions like that cause laughter in the audience. That I
fear. But recently there was some little discussion of this very point and I
seem to recollect the idea being floated that laughter here (of the right kind,
and under control) is not necessarily bad. I will appreciate no end a
discussion of this, and not only this. Generally, are there pitfalls to avoid,
things to clarify in the text, etc? Thanks. A Misseldine
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael A. Norman <
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Date:           Monday, 23 Oct 1995 14:46:24 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Twelfth Night film
 
I just came across an announcement in Playbill Online about the filming of
Twelfth Night, directed by Trevor Nunn. Filming began in October on the project
with stars Nigel Hawthrone, Ben Kingsley and Helena Bonham Carter. The
announcement did not indicate who is playing what roles. This should be an
interesting production. I thought that others might be interested. It seems
like several film productions of the works of Shakespeare will be coming out in
the near future.
 
**Also, I just wanted to say that I find the discussions educational and
entertaining, and I find much value in the list.
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary Jane Miller <
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Date:           Monday, 23 Oct 1995 12:54:20 -0400
Subject: 6.0828  Re: *MND* Productions
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0828  Re: *MND* Productions
 
What I remember about the use of puppets in the Ron Daniels  production was
that they represented most but no all of the fairies, and were manipulated by
actors palying the Victorian under-class - street sweepers and so on, whose
dark greasy clothing seemedto make them invisible - in the Japanese mode-
disappeared when they held the brightly costumed fairies.It was an interesting
solution to the 'problem' of two kindss of Fairies in the play - FAERIE and
'fairies at the bottom of the garden'.
 
Oberon was a powerful and brutal figure who broke the head of one of Titania's
fairies as he tried to defend her. It  flew across the stage as only a puppet
could - and later reappeared with a bandage around its head. In this version,
as I remember it,  the doubling was justified by the fact that Oberon learned a
little about  human compassion from the lovers and Theseus somehow had learned
both compassion and something about the powers of imagination from his
alter-ego Oberon.
 
Mary Jane Miller,
Dept. of Film Studies, Dramatic and Visual Arts,
Brock University,
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <
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Date:           Tuesday, 24 Oct 1995 19:10:00 +0100
Subject: 6.0802 *Tmp*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0802 *Tmp*
 
Michael Baird Saenger wrote
 
>In the most recent issue of Notes and Queries (September 1995), I
>point out that two costumes, originally made for a royal pageant, were given to
>Shakespeare's acting troupe in 1610.
 
I'm happy with Corinea -> Ariel-qua-sea-nymph, but not Amphion -> Caliban,
since the pamphlet describes Amphion as
 
"a graue and iudicious Prophet-like personage, attyred in his apte habits,
euery way answerable to his state and profession, with his wreathe of
Sea-shelles on his head, and his harpe hanging in fayre twine before him"
 
Both costumes are more suited to Ariel-qua-sea-nymph.
 
Gabriel Egan
 

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