1995

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0854.  Monday, 30 October 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Stuart Rice <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 28 Oct 1995 13:46:17 EST
        Subj:   RE: SHK 6.0851  Qs: Happy *Lr.*
 
(2)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 28 Oct 1995 15:46:57 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0851  Qs: Happy *Lr.*
 
(3)     From:   Sam Schimek <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 28 Oct 1995 18:46:24 -0700
        Subj:   Re: Happy *Lr.*
 
(4)     From:   Gail Garloch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Suday, 29 Oct 1995 14:00:30 +0200 (IST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0851 Qs: Happy *Lr.*
 
(5)     From:   Helen Vella Bonavita <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 30 Oct 1995 10:17:39 +0800 (WST)
        Subj:   re: Happy Lear
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stuart Rice <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 28 Oct 1995 13:46:17 EST
Subject: 6.0851  Qs: Happy *Lr.*
Comment:        RE: SHK 6.0851  Qs: Happy *Lr.*
 
Ah, yes, _Happy Lear_.  There was a period where Shakespeare was republished in
a family version as well, where are the invectives and violence was taken out
and replaced with more mundane material.  If I remember correctly, every one
lives at the end of _Happy Lear_, as you put it: I think Edgar and Cordelia get
married and rule the Kingdom together, as well.  I can't remember if I've ever
seen the actually update versions of these plays.
 
Happy, happy, joy, joy,
Stuart Rice
Kenyon College
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 28 Oct 1995 15:46:57 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0851  Qs: Happy *Lr.*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0851  Qs: Happy *Lr.*
 
Nahum Tate (1652-1715) is responsible for the adaptation of *Lear* in which
Cordelia survives and marries Edgar.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sam Schimek <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 28 Oct 1995 18:46:24 -0700
Subject:        Re: Happy *Lr.*
 
This version was written by Nathum Tate (1652-1715) in 1681. In it Cordelia
does not die but lives and marries Edgar. Samuel Johnson in his "General
Observation on King Lear" expresses a preference for it. I admire Johnson
but...
 
Sam
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gail Garloch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Suday, 29 Oct 1995 14:00:30 +0200 (IST)
Subject: 6.0851 Qs: Happy *Lr.*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0851 Qs: Happy *Lr.*
 
The "happy" version of King Lear that Karen Krebs seeks is Nahum Tate's 1681
adaptation which held the stage for nearly two centuries.
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Vella Bonavita <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Oct 1995 10:17:39 +0800 (WST)
Subject:        re: Happy Lear
 
The version referred to is probably Nahum Tate's 1680 *King Lear*, in which
Cordelia does indeed survive - what's more, she lives happily ever after,
reunited with her one true love, Edgar. I find the play interesting  - in an
odd sort of way - because it seems to me to strip one of Shakespeare's
strongest female figures of integrity and independance in one move.
 
Best wishes
Helen Vella Bonavita

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