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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: September ::
Questions and Comments Regarding Grad/Undergrad
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0661.  Friday, 1 September 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Thomas Ellis <
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        Date:   Thursday, 31 Aug 1995 23:20:48 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   (Q) Intros to U-G Shx Classes
 
(2)     From:   J. M. Massi <
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        Date:   Friday, 1 Sep 1995 10:36:48 -0700
        Subj:   Shakespeare on the Web
 
(3)     From:   Ellen Edgerton <
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        Date:   Friday, 1 Sep 95 11:06 EDT
        Subj:   A forwarded request for help
 
(4)     From:   David Lindley <
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        Date:   Friday, 1 Sep 1995 16:52:27 GMT
        Subj:   Re: Grad. Programs
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas Ellis <
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Date:           Thursday, 31 Aug 1995 23:20:48 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        (Q) Intros to U-G Shx Classes
 
Since fall semester is starting up, I'd be interested in hearing from others
how they plan to introduce Shakespeare to their undergraduate classes. In my
own case, I teach all African-American students, who mostly begin by taking the
class only as a requirement to get out of the way before moving on to their
more contemporary scholarly interests. I'm happy to say that by mid-semester,
most of them have become enthusiastic Shakespeare aficionados, though at least
99% of that enthusiasm is due to their encounter with the plays themselves,
rather than to any particular approaches I might use.
 
Still, it's an interesting question: What is your opening gambit, your "take"
on Shakespeare? What strategies do you use to hook the students and galvanize
their interest on the first day? Why have some such gambits succeeded, and
others not?
 
And more particularly, how would you teach Shakespeare to a class of all
African-Americans, who arrive with an already well-developed suspicion of the
European "Grand Tradition" of which Shakespeare is the central icon.
 
--Tom Ellis
Hampton University
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           J. M. Massi <
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Date:           Friday, 1 Sep 1995 10:36:48 -0700
Subject:        Shakespeare on the Web
 
Dear Colleagues:
 
I am teaching two upper-division Shakespeare classes this semester and have
mounted a series of pages for them to the World Wide Web. The pages have had to
go up pretty quickly, so I know there may well be mistakes in them; I am hoping
that anyone interested in the Web out there or in Web-based pedagogy will have
a look at them and send along any comments. The URL is as follows:
http:\\www.wsu.edu:8080\~massij\shakes.html
 
I would greatly appreciate any response or criticism to these pages. Many
thanks!
 
JM Massi, WSU Dept. of English, Pullman, WA 99164-5020
Internet: 
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  OR 
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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ellen Edgerton <
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Date:           Friday, 1 Sep 95 11:06 EDT
Subject:        A forwarded request for help
 
This fellow is going to be teaching a class on *H5* in the very near future and
needs some leads on how to address the following issues in his class.  (I also
gave him info on how to sign up to SHAKSPER himself, as I don't believe he's a
member.)
 
Can anyone help him out?
 
>                      .  My task is to:
>
> 1.  locate one or two pieces of primary/secondary criticism of a film
> performance of the play
>
> 2.  Write 250 words focusing the class on the theoretical/pedagogical issue
> as part of a pedagogical strategy
>
> 3.  Compile a one-page annotated bibliography related to the teaching of th
> play.
 
> Gerard T. Coash, Sr. (Jerry)
> 
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> or 
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(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Lindley <
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Date:           Friday, 1 Sep 1995 16:52:27 GMT
Subject:        Re: Grad. Programs
 
The recent discussion about choosing graduate programmes has been an
interesting one to observe from  the UK.
 
I realise that UK universities traditionally have not offered the kind of
integrated Ph.D programme that is characteristic of US graduate schools; in my
job as MA Tutor for Admissions here at Leeds I am also aware of how very few US
students apply to us to work either at taught masters or at Ph.D levels.
Oxbridge and London have their own attraction (however well or ill justified),
but I suspect that we are not alone in failing to attract students - and
certainly there have been scarcely any suggestions offered on the list that
aspiring Renaissance scholars might look towards the UK for their postgraduate
education.
 
I'd simply be interested in any observations on why this should be so - and
indications of what we need to do to make ourselves more attractive to American
postgraduates.  We are, after all, not short of outstanding scholars and
potential supervisors in this area.
 
David Lindley
 

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