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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: September ::
Re: Comics; Marlowe; Antonio
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 703, Wednesday, 20 September 1995
 
(1)     From:   Joseph M Green <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Sep 1995 13:38:02 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0699  Re: Comics; Marlowe; Burgess
 
(2)     From:   Robert F. O'Connor <
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        Date:   Thursday, 21 Sep 1995 09:46:21 +0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0701  Re: Fictional Christopher Marlowe
 
(3)     From:   Sarah Richardson <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Sep 1995 17:45:35 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0701 Re: Antonio
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joseph M Green <
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Date:           Wednesday, 20 Sep 1995 13:38:02 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 6.0699  Re: Comics; Marlowe; Burgess
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0699  Re: Comics; Marlowe; Burgess
 
I seem to remember that Shakespeare was featured in one of the Uncle Scrooge
comic books in the fifties -- illustrated, I think, by Karl Barth.  Donald,
Uncle Scrooge and Huey, Dewey and Louie were transported by Gyro Gerloose's
time machine to Venice where they encountered Shylock.  Of course, Scrooge and
Shylock hit it off at once and Jessica was promised in marriage to Scrooge if
he could choose the correct casket.  Scrooge wanted to go for the gold, of
course -- as Shylock hoped -- and would have, for sure, lost his pinfeathers (I
see that I have neglected to mention the deal Scrooge and Shylock made) if it
wasn't for the timely intervention of the Bard -- portrayed by a crossgartered
Goofy.  Shylock is foiled. In the meantime, Donald and his nephews have looted
Shylock's home with the connivance of Jessica who is, in fact, in love with
Donald. In the meantime Antonio, mooning about the docks, discovers the Time
Machine and, thinking it a waterclock, ships it off to Othello in Cyprus with
whom he is really in love.  Scrooge and the gang hurry to the docks with the
loot and Jessica only to discover the Time Machine gone.  Shylock is in hot
pursuit with the Doge by this time but, luckily, two gentlemen from Verona are
about ready to cast off. Everyone but Dewey leaps into the ship.  Dewey is
unlucky enough to be detained by the Ancient Mariner who stoppeth one of three.
The rest escape.  Donald and Scrooge are about ready to have a go at each other
with cutlass and sackbutt when the two gentlemen calm them down and suggest
that Scrooge just give Jessica to his uncle. They agree but Jessica is outraged
and leaps overboard where she is picked up by Prospero and Miranda who have
just been exiled again after Caliban writes an article denouncing them as
colonizers. There is much more, of course.  I have heard that there is a
suppressed version of the ending -- a tragic ending -- in which Donald dies on
the field at Dunsinane, Huey and Louie are baked in a pie by Titus Andronicus,
Dewey is roasted by a person from Porlock and Scrooge ends up in a cave with
Timon of Athens by whom he is killed in what seems a suicide pact.  The final
panel depicts a host of Disney characters mourning before an urn..."For these
dead birds sigh a prayer."
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert F. O'Connor <
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Date:           Thursday, 21 Sep 1995 09:46:21 +0700
Subject: 6.0701  Re: Fictional Christopher Marlowe
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0701  Re: Fictional Christopher Marlowe
 
Another addition to the list: a recent novel by Robin Chapman, 'Christoferus'.
Although the main character is Thomas Kyd - who, in the novel, did not die
after his torture and confession - it concerns Marlowe in that Kyd, driven by
guilt over his friend's death, sets out to discover who in fact committed the
deed.  Not a great book, but an interesting contribution to the Marlowe
mystery.  Soon there will be as many candidates for killer as there are for the
Ripper!
 
Robert F. O'Connor

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English Department
Australian National University
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sarah Richardson <
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Date:           Wednesday, 20 Sep 1995 17:45:35 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 6.0701 Re: Antonio
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0701 Re: Antonio
 
I believe this year's June issue of American Theatre contained a lead article
dedicated to the survey and comparison of several recent MERCHANT productions.
The article even contained a comparison chart that addressed several of the
issues that Sam Schimek raises for inquiry. (I don't have the issue in front of
me so it may have been the July issue.) I found the article very interesting
from a performative perspective, though may not dig as deep critically and
textually as you want.  Hope this helps...
 
Sarah Richardson
University of California - Irvine
Dept. of Drama

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