Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: September ::
Re: owe-own
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0711, Friday, 22 September 1995.
 
(1)     From:   <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thu, 21 Sep 1995 12:53:35 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0704 Qs: Mary Wroth; owe-own
 
(2)     From:   Sean Lawrence <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 21 Sep 1995 14:01:12 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0704 Qs: Mary Wroth; owe-own
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thu, 21 Sep 1995 12:53:35 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 6.0704 Qs: Mary Wroth; owe-own
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0704 Qs: Mary Wroth; owe-own
 
Chris.  You might check Al Shoaf's books on Dante and Milton for a fine
meditation on how these words worked together in the Renaissance.  I don't know
what else he's published on the matter since then, but he was thinking a lot
about it ten or so years ago.  The third step should be "know," shouldn't it?
Shoaf shows how these work together in *Milton, Poet of Duality*.  It also
seems to work for me in Olivia's "ourselves we do not owe."  Please let me know
what you find out.
 
Michael Harrawood
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 21 Sep 1995 14:01:12 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 6.0704 Qs: Mary Wroth; owe-own
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0704 Qs: Mary Wroth; owe-own
 
Chris has an interesting point.  My suggestion would be to head towards the
vestiges of feudalism still kicking around, if not in practice, at least in
theory, at the time.  The liege "owes" protection, etc.,--he therefore "owns"
the fief.  The mutual responsibilities of the system seem to be neatly
expressed in this word-play, or similarity, or whatever.
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.