1995

Shakespeare Movies

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0660.  Thursday, 31 August 1995.
 
From:           David Reinheimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Aug 1995 14:28:47 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Shakespeare Movies
 
In class today, one of my students told me about a blurb in the present issue
of _Entertainment Weekly_ on two movies to be released in December. One is the
Fishburne/Branagh _Othello_; much to the relief of some members of the list
(remembering the shock expressed a few months ago) Uma Thurman apparently will
not be Desdemona, but rather Irene Clark will play the role (I didn't see the
article, so I'm not entirely sure on this).  The other is a version of
Richard III_, which, following the "let's-cast-Americans-to-get-people-
in-the-seats" trend, includes Annette Benig and Robert Downey, Jr. in the cast;
again, I didn't see the article, so I don't know what roles they're playing.
These movies are due to be released on the 15th and 22nd of December.

CFP; Michigan Festival

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0659.  Thursday, 31 August 1995.
 
(1)     From:   T. Scott Clapp <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Aug 1995 11:22:27 -0700 (MST)
        Subj:   Call for Papers
 
(2)     From:   Ronald Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Aug 95 14:44:39 EST
        Subj:   Michigan Festival
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           T. Scott Clapp <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Aug 1995 11:22:27 -0700 (MST)
Subject:        Call for Papers
 
Call For Papers
 
The Future of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance
Problems, Trends, and Opportunities in Research
 
              February 15-17, 1996
 
ACMRS at Arizona State University invites papers for its second annual
interdisciplinary conference on Medieval and Renaissance studies on the general
topic of problems and new directions in the study of the Middle Ages and Early
Modern period. Possible session topics include, but are not restricted to:
 
      problems of interdisciplinarity
      integrating literature and history
      local history versus period history
      copyright and technology
      textual studies
      the new philology
      politics and agendas of disciplines
      the future of Med/Ren studies in art history,
      history, literature, religion, economics, etc.
 
While we want a broad spectrum of area studies represented, we are particularly
interested in papers on Scandinavian, Baltic/East European, Judaic, and
Mediterranean Studies.  There will also be a number of open sessions.
 
Papers accepted for sessions on Mediterranean Studies will have passed the
first level of review for publication in the journal Mediterranean Studies,
sponsored by the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth, the Medieval and
Renaissance Colloquium (MARC) at the University of Michigan, and ACMRS at
Arizona State University.
 
ACMRS will also host The Medieval Book: A Workshop in Codicological Practice.
This pre-conference half-day workshop led by Richard Clement, University of
Kansas, will focus on the making of the medieval codex.  Participants will
discuss the preparation of parchment and paper, the making of pens and ink, and
then will make and prepare several quires in preparation for writing.  NOTE:
This workshop does not cover scripts and is not calligraphic.
 
This year's keynote speaker will be Marcia Colish, Oberlin College.
 
The conference will be held at the Radisson Mission Palms Hotel, two blocks
from the ASU campus in Tempe, a suburb of Phoenix, Arizona.  The high
temperature in the "Valley of the Sun" during February averages 70 degrees.
 
Proposals for sessions and detailed abstracts or complete papers will be
accepted beginning July 1, 1995.  The deadline is November 1, 1995.  Please
send two copies of your abstract, paper and/or session proposal, along with two
copies of your c.v., to the program committee chair:  Robert E. Bjork,
Director, ACMRS, Arizona State University, Box 872301, Tempe, AZ 85287-2301.
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Phone: (602) 965-5900.  Fax: (602) 965-1681.
 
T. Scott Clapp, Program Coordinator
ACMRS (AZ Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies)
Arizona State University
Box 872301
Tempe, AZ  85287-2301
Phone: (602) 965-5900; FAX: (602) 965-1681
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ronald Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Aug 95 14:44:39 EST
Subject:        Michigan Festival
 
Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Michigan (just outside Grand
Rapids) is holding its second annual Shakespeare Festival, September 22 to
October 1, 1994.
 
Romeo & Juliet  will be produced, acted by college students and two pros. We'll
have a number of film showings, with discussions of film/theater differences.
There'll be garden performances of scenes and Shakespeare spin-offs. Jean
Howard will be lecturing and visiting classes. Some Renaissance music and a
Renaissance dinner finale.
 
Please stop in, if you're in the area. I can send a full schedule by snail mail
to anyone who is interested.
 
ron dwelle (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Re: *WT* Production; Shakespeare and Company

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0657.  Wednesday, 30 August 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Charles Crupi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Aug 1995 16:22:57 +0000 (EASTERN)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0642  Re: *WT* Production
 
(2)     From:   Tom Dale Keever <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Aug 1995 03:34:56 -0400
        Subj:   Shakespeare and Company
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Charles Crupi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Aug 1995 16:22:57 +0000 (EASTERN)
Subject: 6.0642  Re: *WT* Production
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0642  Re: *WT* Production
 
To Dale Lyles:  Just so you know you are not alone, I am directing WT at Albion
College in February.  And yes, it's scary.  --Charles Crupi
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Dale Keever <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Aug 1995 03:34:56 -0400
Subject:        Shakespeare and Company
 
I have drafted and will soon send my letter of support for Shakespeare and
Company.  Though it is not one of the theaters where I have performed
Shakespeare, I stage managed there one summer and have fond memories of the
place and the people.  I hope others will join me in supporting this company.
 
Their current plight is a cautionary tale for everyone who has to navigate the
hazards of arts funding and some background history is instructive.
 
When Tina Packer was looking in the late seventies for a place to house her
projected theater troupe she happened upon Edith Wharton's old summer home with
spacious grounds in The Berkshires.  It was on the market because the previous
tenant, the all-girl Foxhollow School,  had gone bankrupt in 1971 or '72 and
the building had been standing idle for years.  It might as easily have been
taken over by a developer, knocked down, and replaced with a subdivision, but
Packer was able to strike a deal.  Her company built an outdoor stage near the
house and set out to bring Shakespeare to the community and to the area's many
summer visitors.
 
Though the actors and tech crew pitched in to renovate the large old house it
was clear  that it needed more work than the fledgling theater company could
afford to give it.  The funding that was available for historic buildings could
not be granted to a non-profit corporation devoted to the production of
theater, so Packer's associates, Dennis Krausnick and Mitch Berenson, created
another non-profit corporation in '79 or '80 devoted to restoring and
maintaining the building and grounds. The mortgage was assigned to The National
Trust for Historic Preservation and the house was placed on the Historic
Register about 1982. The new group's board of local amateur preservationists
set to work conducting guided tours about the newly designated "Historic
Building" and beating the government and foundation bushes for restoration
money so that Packer and her colleagues could get on with the business of
putting on plays and training actors.  Mind you, had it not been for the
theater company, the building would not have come under the protection of the
National Trust and might well have perished.
 
"Edith Wharton Restoration, Inc." proved as grateful and hospitable to its
parent as Goneril and Regan.  Its board members, bigger fans of dead buildings
and brick-a-brack than of living theater and actors, soon decided that the best
improvement they could make to the mansion would be to rid it of  those pesky
actors.
 
By the time I arrived in 1984 the tension between the theater company and the
preservationists was already serious.  I stage managed two plays by and about
Edith Wharton in the mansion's sitting room. We were at constant logger-heads
with the lady who bitterly resented not being able to lead her guided tours
across the stage during the performances.  I eventually reached an amicable
accomodation with her boss, but not before I had to endure the sight of
bewildered tourists being ostentatiously sheparded past the French windows in
the middle of my show.
 
The most ardent of the preservationists have long wanted to evict the theater
company completely and with the help of The National Trust they may finally
succeed.  The company's "lease" on the space they created is up in three years
and if the National Trust isn't persuaded to let them stay they will have to
start over somewhere else.  Please lend your support!
 
The lesson to all of you who consider incorporating under the byzantine rules
that govern non-profits is NEVER CREATE A BOARD YOU CAN'T CONTROL !  I could
cite a few other examples in New York and elsewhere of people who built
theaters out of nothing and then found themselves fighting, too often
unsuccessfully, to control or even survive in their own creations. Prospective
theater founders, take heed!
 
To help out, address letters to:
 
Frank Sanchis, VP
National Trust for Historic Preservation
1785 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, D.C. 20036
 
and send them to Washington or to
 
Shakespeare and Company,
The Mount, Lenox, MA 01240
 
for forwarding.
 
If you have never had the pleasure of sitting under the stars and watching this
company do Shakespeare trust me - this is a troupe worth saving!

Re: Puns; Graduate Programs

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0658.  Thursday, 31 August 1995.
 
(1)     From:   David Evett <R0870%This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Aug 1995 12:26 ET
        Subj:   puns
 
(2)     From:   Erika Lin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 31 Aug 1995 10:18:29 -0700
        Subj:   Re: Graduate Programs
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <R0870%This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Aug 1995 12:26 ET
Subject:        puns
 
I, too, found John Drakakis' volley on puns dracoconian (pun intended); a
temperate reminder of the possibility of our projecting modern interpretations
on any particular term (e.g. content/content) and the corresponding
responsbility tocheck available linguistic resources (dictionaries,
concordances) before using the interpretation in an argument would seem to have
been sufficient--and avoided overstating the instability of early modern
English.
 
Temperately,
Dave Evett
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Erika Lin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 31 Aug 1995 10:18:29 -0700
Subject:        Re: Graduate Programs
 
Dear Fellow SHAKSPER-eans,
 
A very hearty thanks to all of you who have contributed your thoughts in
response to my request for advice about graduate study!  I really appreciate
the moral support you've shown in addition to the more practical assistance.
All the advice has been very good, and the more I get, the better, as far as
I'm concerned.
 
As far as my own background goes, I'm afraid my first posting was a little
confusing.  I received my B.A. in English from U.C.-Berkeley in May of 1994,
but I am not currently enrolled in the M.A. program here.  I decided to take a
year or two off from school, and I have been working as a staff member here at
the university.  As an undergraduate, literary theory was not a part of the
standard curriculum, so my request for helpful books and advice in that regard
is to aid in making up for some of those deficiencies.
 
Again, thanks to all of you who have responded to my request.  I really appre-
ciate it, and I will keep you posted as to what happens.
 
Sincerely,
Erika Lin

Re: Puns

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0656.  Wednesday, 30 August 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Martin Green <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Aug 1995 16:45:06 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Puns
 
(2)     From:   Piers Lewis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Aug 1995 12:19:50 -0600
        Subj:   Re: insults, innuendo, ad hominem attacks
 
(3)     From:   John Lee <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Aug 1995 10:53:38 +0100 (BST)
        Subj:   Re: Puns
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Green <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Aug 1995 16:45:06 -0400
Subject:        Re: Puns
 
I am truly puzzled by John Drakakis' posting on puns, and would appreciate any
help he can offer toward understanding his thought on this subject.
 
I have five points of puzzlement:
 
1. JD writes that "playing with words for a humorous effect (one of the
definitions of the 'pun')  depends upon a normative linguistic stability."
Well, doesn't all oral and written communication depend upon "normative
linguistic stability" [which I assume to mean something like "sounds having a
generally agreed-upon meaning"]? And if this is true of all speech, what is
special, or meaningful, about this statement, as it pertains to puns?
 
2. Why does JD focus upon the "humorous effect" of some puns? The
content/content pun which occasioned the recent postings on puns is not a
humorous pun; rather it is a pun which, by making operable the several meanings
of words having the same sound, or spelling, extends and deepens the meaning of
the sentence in which the word is found. Shakespeare uses such puns to a very
great extent and, the Sonnets, in particular,  have a great many such puns.
 
3. JD continues: "The question I am posing is what effect might be produced at
a time when that stability and standardization of meaning has yet to come fully
into being." Well, if "stability and standardization of meaning" has not come
"fully" into being, then  there can be no pun, intended or discernible, with
respect to words having no generally-agreed upon meaning. [But NB: language
changes, and sometimes puns intended and discerned in one era are not perceived
in a later era, e.g., "Loves her by the foot." "He may not by the yard." LLL,
v, 2 676]
 
4. JD goes on: "Where multiple meanings are constantly in play, then the
effects must also be multiple."  But multiple meanings are NOT constantly in
play, because a speaker or writer has to be purposeful and artful to craft
sentences which enable one word to bear two or more meanings. [Sometimes, to be
sure, people do this by accident, and then, realizing what they've done,
usually say, "No pun intended."]  Thus,  the "hang" in "We shall hang the
clothes out to dry in the yard" has one meaning only (as does also the "yard"),
whereas the "hang's" in "We must all hang together, or we shall all hang
separately" are put together in a way purposefully to invoke two separate
meanings.
 
5. JD concludes: "I am asking a question about cultural differences which the
simple label 'pun' masks." This seems to me to be a complete non sequitur, and
thus gets to the heart of my puzzlement, for I cannot grasp what it is that has
gone before which leads to this conclusion. Cultural differences?  How so? And
how masked by puns?
 
And what is the "New Bibliography"?
 
Since I am very interested in puns (especially as used by Shakespeare), I would
appreciate any help you might be able to offer.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Piers Lewis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Aug 1995 12:19:50 -0600
Subject:        Re: insults, innuendo, ad hominem attacks
 
I thought name-calling and other forms of insulting language had been ruled out
of order on this list.
 
Piers Lewis
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Lee <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Aug 1995 10:53:38 +0100 (BST)
Subject:        Re: Puns
 
In reply to Drakakis
 
At the risk of being labelled neanderthal, I confess I still don't understand
this simple point about puns ...
 
> Playing with words for a humorous effect (one of the definitions of the "pun")
> depends upon a normative linguistic stability.
 
What does normative linguistic stability mean, please?  Does linguistic
stability refer to the attempted standardization of grammar and spelling?
Presumably so, as language is never stable &c.  But then what does normative
mean?  Is it being used as a nuance word, to imply that linguistic stability is
bad (which it would be, if it existed)?  And can the suggestion really be that
playing with words wasn't done before the standardization of grammar and
spelling? That oral cultures, or Chaucer, for instance, don't play with words?
 
> The question I am posing is what effect might be produced at a time when
> that stability and standardization of meaning has yet to come fully into
> being.
 
Again this looses me, as I don't really understand 'that stability' and can't
imagine a time when 'standardization of _meaning_' has come fully into being.
 
> Where multiple meanings are constantly in play, then the effects
> must also be multiple.
 
When aren't multiple meanings in play?  They're clearly at play here... And why
_must_ multiple meanings have multiple 'effects'?  (effects being humour, irony
and so forth?)
 
> I am asking a question about cultural difference which the simple
> label "pun" masks.
 
Which question?  That writers of the English Renaissance don't perceive the pun
as a playful aspect of language, but rather as maleable/useful aspect? So that
we, in taking the pun playfully, reveal our distance and difference from them,
as we read into the past what is not there?
 
What of people such as Puttenham in this context?
 
What book should I read?
 
Confusedly,
John Lee

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