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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: August ::
Re: Hamlet: Cardenio; Follies; Construct
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0610.  Saturday, 5 August 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Friday, 4 Aug 1995 14:08:44 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0607 Re: Hamlet
 
(2)     From:   Mickie Mosley <
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        Date:   Friday, 04 Aug 95 11:52:56 pst
        Subj:   Cardenio or The Second Handmaiden's Tragedy
 
(3)     From:   J.I.Stuart <
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        Date:   Friday, 4 Aug 1995 17:14:04 -0600
        Subj:   Nick Bottom and the Mechanicals
 
(4)     From:   Stephanie Hughes <
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        Date:   Friday, 4 Aug 1995 21:16:29 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0604  Re: Shakespeare as Cultural Construct
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Friday, 4 Aug 1995 14:08:44 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 6.0607 Re: Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0607 Re: Hamlet
 
Thank you, Bill, for recommending the Levin book.  I'll take a look.
 
I would disagree with saying that "In Hamlet's Christian world, there is no
non-being" but I suppose it's better to just leave the disagreement as
disagreement.
 
Cheers,
Sean.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mickie Mosley <
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Date:           Friday, 04 Aug 95 11:52:56 pst
Subject:        Cardenio or The Second Handmaiden's Tragedy
 
Folks:
 
I received some old postings today regarding Cardenio and I am truly grateful.
On one of those postings there was a statement "This play was registered by
Humphrey Moseley as authored by Shakespeare and Fletcher, so you've got the
best proof going that it existed and actually was written Shakespeare and
Fletcher".
 
Who is the world was Humphrey Moseley?  A Registrar for the Court - a censor -
who?
 
Any information would be most appreciated.
 
     Mickie
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           J.I.Stuart <
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Date:           Friday, 4 Aug 1995 17:14:04 -0600
Subject:        Nick Bottom and the Mechanicals
 
Further to your heavy metal group- you will never rival Billy and the
Theatricals (Robby Greene on bass guitar, Chris Marlowe on drums (later died in
a freak drinking accident) and Benny Jonson on vocals (later left to form Benny
and the Cynics)
 
If you go a bit further on you get Johny Donne and the Metaphysicals ( with wee
Georgie Herbert on Hammond organ)- they had a hit with "Johny be not proud,
though some have called thee..."
 
Or what about Wee  Willie Wordsworth and the Romantics, the super-group of the
19th century- ST Coleridge on synths ( he later went on to form Sammy T and the
Love Reaction)  Johno Keats on  rhythm guitar and Thomas de Quincey on
everything.
 
However, none of them can hold a candle to the Sisters of Mercy - Emily,
Charlotte and Ann.
 
Best wishes
Ian Stuart
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <
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Date:           Friday, 4 Aug 1995 21:16:29 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 6.0604  Re: Shakespeare as Cultural Construct
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0604  Re: Shakespeare as Cultural Construct
 
Perhaps we "think" in some kind of language, English, French, math, music, but
we also do something else with our minds, probably with our right brains. While
our left brain is "thinking", our right brain is doing something else,
something for which we have no word, since the function of the right brain is
not to label things. Perhaps "listen" is the closest we can come to what we do
with our minds when we meditate, daydream, listen to music, remember the past.
We share with humans of all languages this basic mental activity, and perhaps
with animals as well, certainly with babies. Yet I would have to say that the
language that we are taught in childhood does mold to a very great extent our
thinking. Those words that cannot be found in other languages are a key to what
makes our own language unique. For instance the word "sympatico" in Spanish
can't really be translated as "sympathetic". It means much more than that.
Sympathetic is a pallid word compared to sympatico. When a Spaniard says that
someone is "sympatico" it is the highest of compliments. This little difference
can be seen as symbolic of the great difference between the two cultures.
Another word that shows the difference between the English culture and the
Roman cultures is "home". Home has a sweet sound, like the call of a horn. It
is almost "om", the Sanskrit word meaning the center of things. To say I am "at
home" has a much different feeling than the French "chez moi", "by me", or "en
casa" in Spanish, "in the house". It is a paradox, when we are alone we
"cognate" like every other being on the planet, but when we think and try to
communicate, we are forced into separate channels. That is, unless we spend a
very great deal of time learning other languages.
 

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