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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: August ::
Qs: Time in H4; Macready; Bust; TGV Ending
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0613.  Monday, 14 August 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Jung Jimmy <
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        Date:   Monday, 07 Aug 95 14:03:00 PDT
        Subj:   The time in Henry 4
 
(2)     From:   Nick Clary <
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        Date:   Monday, 07 Aug 1995 15:10:59 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Macready material
 
(3)     From:   Richard J Kennedy <
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        Date:   Monday, 7 Aug 1995 12:48:15 -0700
        Subj:   [Holy Trinity Bust]
 
(4)     From:   Sarah Elizabeth Richardson <
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        Date:   Monday, 7 Aug 1995 20:55:55 -0500
        Subj:   TWO GENTS ending
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jung Jimmy <
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Date:           Monday, 07 Aug 95 14:03:00 PDT
Subject:        The time in Henry 4
 
I recently saw the San Diego production of Henry 4 parts I & II.  I haven't
gone back to count, but it seems to me that questions regarding the time were
repeated by numerous characters.  I kept hearing the question, "what o'clock is
it?" and such.
 
Has someone assigned a critical significance to this, or do the characters just
want to know what time it is?  or maybe it was just me; it was a fine
production, but I suppose anything that goes for 4 hours might lead my
subconscious to ask, "what o'clock is it?"
 
jimmy
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nick Clary <
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Date:           Monday, 07 Aug 1995 15:10:59 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Macready material
 
Earlier in the year David Peck noted that there was a great deal of material on
Macready at the Theatre Museum near Covent Garden.  I would like to make a
specific inquiry there.  Can someone recommend a contact person at the Theatre
Museum (or at the Society for Theatre Research)?  Also, is there an e-mail
address that may be used?  The snail-mail address I have is the following:
 
        Society for Theatre Research
        c/o Theatre Museum
        1 E. Tavistock Street
        London WC2E 7PA
        England
 
Thank you for whatever help you might offer.
 
Nick Clary
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard J Kennedy <
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Date:           Monday, 7 Aug 1995 12:48:15 -0700
Subject:        [Holy Trinity Bust]
 
I know there are places to get the bust of Shakespeare, that handsome, goateed
fellow, but doesn anyone know where I can get a bust as it is in Trinity
church.  It's not very attractive, but it's called authentic, and I wonder if
anyone thought they might be able to sell a copy, and where I could buy a copy.
Full size, or 1/2 at least, and plaster is fine.
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sarah Elizabeth Richardson <
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Date:           Monday, 7 Aug 1995 20:55:55 -0500
Subject:        TWO GENTS ending
 
I'm currently both performing in and producing a production of TWO GENTLEMEN OF
VERONA in my beloved hometown of Austin, TX where we have tried to deal with
the difficult last scene of the play in a way that deals with the sensitive
issues of sexism and sexual assault while still embracing the play as a whole
as a comedy.  We've fought like cats and dogs amongst ourselves about how to do
it (and sadly, it was usually split down gender lines), but have ultimately
come up with something that satisfies our sensibilities and thus far has been
very well-received by audiences, male and female alike. I'd love to hear how
other directors and actors have dealt with this play, and especially the final
scene, since we struggled so much with it.  As briefly as possible, here's what
we finally arrived at:
 
When Proteus turns and begins an attack of Silvia, Julia (as Sebastion) leaps
in between and wrestles with him until Valentine's shout of "Ruffian!" stops
everyone in their tracks.  Valentine berates Proteus as Julia runs to aid
Silvia.  Juila and Silvia watch as Valentine listens to Proteus' apololgies and
then forgives him.  The women register their horror at the all too quick
absolution as Valentine turns to offer Silvia to Proteus as a token of his
friendship and forgiveness.  Upon hearing the offer, Silvia pulls away in
horror and Julia angerly drops to her knees shouting  "O me unhappy!" With
force and anger, she then intentionally offers Proteus her own ring, only
sarcastically pretending to have done so in error.  After her identity is
revealed and Proteus has once again affirmed his love to her with, "I have my
wish forever," Julia pulls her hand away swiftly-- a hand that Valentine placed
within Proteus' hand despite her non-verbal protestations  - and states firmly,
"And I mine." Proteus retreats to a corner of the stage for most of the rest of
the scene, all too keenly aware of what he has done and what he has lost.  Then
the duke arrives, forgives Valentine and offers Silvia to him using the same
hand-in-hand gesture as Valentine did with Prot and Julia.  Silvia likewise
pulls away, but Valentine and the Duke, in their excitement, do not seem to
notice her rejection.  He calls to Proteus as the men all begin to exit the
stage, trying to cheer him up with his final promises of marriage (after
Proteus has paid the penance of having is transgressions talked about a lot)
and "one feast, one house, one mutual happiness."  With the exception of
Proteus, the men do not notice that the women have not given their consent to
these marriages.  The final stage picture leaves Julia and Silvia alone on the
stage in dumbfounded silence, looking across the stage floor at all the torn
letters (we managed to find a clever way to get each letter in the play torn on
stage) until their eyes meet and they slowly take hands before the lights go to
black.
 
What Silvia and Julia are going to do at this point is left to the imagination,
but the solidarity between them and at least their rejection of the current
state of affairs is quite clear.  To pull this version off with believability
has required some split second timing, but we think it's working and comes
logically out of the play up until this point.  We would welcome any thoughts
and comments on this or any other aspect of TWO GENTS. By the way, if you are
in Central Texas and would like to see us perform, we'd love to have you...
 
The Boxtree Players present THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA
at The Museum of Fine Arts, Austin
823 Congress Ave.
Austin, TX
August, 3,4,5, 10,11,12 -- Thurs through Friday
(512) 479-6249 for reservations
 
Sarah Richardson
University of California at Irvine
Department of Drama
 

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