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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: August ::
Qs: Graduate Programs
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0633.  Tuesday, 22 August 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Erika Lin <
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        Date:   Monday, 21 Aug 1995 09:33:28 -0700
        Subj:   Opinions on graduate English departments wanted
 
(2)     From:   Karen Krebser <
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        Date:   Monday, 21 Aug 95 12:48:21 -0700
        Subj:   Ph.D. Program Resources?
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Erika Lin <
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Date:           Monday, 21 Aug 1995 09:33:28 -0700
Subject:        Opinions on graduate English departments wanted
 
Dear SHAKSPER members,
 
Hello, everyone.  I'm in the process of applying to PhD programs in English,
and, being in the preliminary phase of looking into different schools, I'd like
to solicit opinions from SHAKSPER members about the strengths and weaknesses of
various departments.  My major concentration will probably be Shakespeare, with
possible minor concentrations in literary theory or Asian- American studies.
I'm most interested in which professors are teaching where and what you think
of them, but anything pertaining to the departments (reputation, emphasis
within a department, general atmosphere, etc.) would be extremely useful to
me--the longer and more detailed, the better.  Any advice on the following
would also be greatly appreciated: (a.) what the most important books to read
for Shakespearean studies are, (b.) which literary theorists I should be
familiar with, and (c.) how much of "a" and "b" above I should have completed
before I apply.  The schools I'm considering right now are listed below.  If
I've left out any schools that have good Renaissance departments, please let me
know.  Any help in whittling down this list would also be welcome.
 
In no particular order, the schools I'm considering are:
 
1) U. of California - Berkeley
2) Harvard
3) Stanford
4) U. of Pennsylvania
5) Columbia
6) U. of Michigan - Ann Arbor
7) Princeton
8) U. of Chicago
9) Duke
10) Brown
11) U. of Texas - Austin
12) U. of California - San Diego
13) John Hopkins
14) Cornell
15) Rutgers
16) City University of New York
17) U. of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
18) U. of Virginia - Charlottesville
19) U. of California - Los Angeles
20) U. of Wisconsin - Madison
21) U. of California - Santa Barbara
22) U. of California - Irvine
23) U. of Minnesota - Minneapolis
24) U. of Maryland - College Park
25) U. of Indiana - Indianapolis
26) U. of Toronto
27) U. of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign
28) U. of Iowa
29) U. of Washington - Seattle
30) Northwestern
31) Cambridge
32) Oxford
 
Again, my sincere thanks to any help SHAKSPEReans can provide.  Feel free to
email me privately if you do not want to post directly to the list.
 
Erika Lin
University of California at Berkeley
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Krebser <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 21 Aug 95 12:48:21 -0700
Subject:        Ph.D. Program Resources?
 
Fellow SHAKSPERians,
 
Greetings and salutations! I fervently hope that I am not posting this query to
you all inappropriately; I know such requests are often followed by hearty
rounds of "do your own homework!" and "whatsa matter, your library broke?"
However, knowing the value of this conference as a resource, I would feel
foolish for not taking advantage of the collected wisdom here.
 
I am currently finishing up an MA in English Lit., and am thinking about
pursuing a Ph.D. in some aspect of English Renaissance drama (to begin in the
Fall of 1997). In your opinions (esteemed, one and all), where would be the
best place to pursue such a thing, university-wise, in the U.S. [or abroad]?
Are there particular universities that are best for advanced degrees in this
area? Centers and/or departments with resources geared particularly toward
study of the English Renaissance? My goal is to eventually find work in a
library or research center; at this point, I'm not looking to teach.
 
I am chasing this info. in my own library, and am picking the various brains of
my professors (now *that's* a visual); as I mentioned above, I would certainly
appreciate any additional information, guidance, and opinions.
 
Thanks in advance,
Karen Krebser
San Jose State University
 
PS. A hearty thanks to the individual on this list who recommended George
Garrett's "Entered from the Sun--The Murder of Marlowe". A ripping yarn!
 

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