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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: August ::
Re: NYSF; Salvini
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0638.  Wednesday, 23 August 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Elizabeth Blye Schmitt <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Aug 1995 16:59:43 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0620 Re: NYSF Tro.; Time; Edgar
 
(2)     From:   John Mucci <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Aug 1995 11:57:43 -0400
        Subj:   Salvini; Sleepwalking
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Elizabeth Blye Schmitt <
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Date:           Tuesday, 22 Aug 1995 16:59:43 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 6.0620 Re: NYSF Tro.; Time; Edgar
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0620 Re: NYSF Tro.; Time; Edgar
 
Specific ref to NYSF
 
Did no one see Patrick Stewart in the TEMPEST? I heard rumors that it was
great, but saw nothing on SHAKSPER. Could you be waiting for its Broadway run?
Had I not been a)ready to give birth, and b) in Dallas, both my husband and i
would have braved camping out in the Park to see this one. Come on somebody
give over!
 
Elizabeth Schmitt
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Mucci <
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Date:           Tuesday, 22 Aug 1995 11:57:43 -0400
Subject:        Salvini; Sleepwalking
 
Since I've been going over the very curious article about Salvini which I found
this summer, I thought I'd put in his two cents worth anent the questions of
changing the texts for the sake of the directors' concept. In the 1870's, Helen
Zimmern wrote an article about Salvini in "The Gentlemen's Magazine," and she
quotes the Italian actor as saying:
 
>"When I read this grand tragedy [of Macbeth] for the first time,
>I expected to see the somnambulist scene of the wife followed by
>one of the husband, and it was quite difficult to persuade
>myself of the contrary.  It seems extravagant this effect
>produced on my mind, but yet it seems to me justifiable.  The
>somnambulist scene takes place at the beginning of the fifth
>act, and up to then neither the waiting-maid nor the doctor has
>given a hint of such a condition.  No one expects it or has
>reason to foresee it."  It is Lady Macbeth who has ever been the
>strong one, who has called him coward, laughed at his
>hallucinations, "never a single words of remorse or repentance
>from her lips.  How then comes this resolute woman suddenly to
>falsify the terrible but grand impression the audience has
>gained of her up to now?  And why has the author, ever rigidly
>observant to maintain his characters the same from beginning to
>end, made an exception for Lady Macbeth?  Is it illness that
>makes her weak and vacillating?  It may be; but this scene seems
>to me originally composed for Macbeth, and afterwards changed
>for the benefit of some actor (actresses were not then employed)
>who, perhaps, did not think the part he had to sustain
>sufficient.  I thank him from my heart for having taken it from
>Macbeth; the burden of this role is sufficiently exorbitant."
 
>An original idea certainly on Signor Salvini's part.  What will
>the Shakespeare critics say to it?>
 
Salvini's further ideas about Macbeth, as well as Hamlet and Lear, are
fascinating and unfettered by the thought of what "the Shakespeare critics"
would say. (I will be happy to send the whole text to anyone who wishes--about
5,000 words).
 
John Mucci
GTE VisNet
 

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