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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: August ::
Re: Grad. Programs; *Chimes*; Q: ACT *Tam.*; Scansion
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0646.  Saturday, 26 August 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Robert C. Baum <
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        Date:   Friday, 25 Aug 95 12:21:11 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0643  Re: Graduate Programs
 
(2)     From:   Juliette Cunico <
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        Date:   Friday, 25 Aug 1995 12:00:17 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0644 Qs: *Chimes*;
 
(3)     From:   James Schaefer <SCHAEFEJ@GUVAX.BITNET>
        Date:   Friday, 25 Aug 1995 13:03:29 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0640  Re: Scansion
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert C. Baum <
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 >
Date:           Friday, 25 Aug 95 12:21:11 EDT
Subject: 6.0643  Re: Graduate Programs
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0643  Re: Graduate Programs
 
Don Foster wrote:
 
>But Erika: Isn't a list of 32 programs (or 33, with UMass) casting your net
>rather wide?  Perhaps you should begin by selecting those Shakespeare or Asian
>Studies scholars with whom you'd most heartily wish to study, and then check
>out their respective departments.
 
Here, here.
 
Begin with faculty and critical approach and then limit your graduate options.
The individual visions of an institution's researchers and professors should be
your guiding light.  Your list is slowly going to become oppressive. . .not to
mention the amount of background (critical) reading you'll have to do in the
process.
 
Yikes!
--bob

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P.S.
 
Who wants to give a plug for Duke?  I'm curious, myself, and contemplating a
change of direction toward Shakespeare studies or maybe I'll continue in
American Literature or maybe head to cultural studies or maybe I'll. . . . .
 
Thanks!
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Juliette Cunico <
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 >
Date:           Friday, 25 Aug 1995 12:00:17 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 6.0644 Qs: *Chimes*;
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0644 Qs: *Chimes*;
 
_Chimes at Midnight_ can be rented through Facets Video in Chicago, Illinois.
The toll-free number is 1-800-331-6197.  Happy viewing!
 
And:  Does anyone know where I can get a good copy of the San Francisco ACT
commedia-influenced production of _The Taming of the Shrew?_
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Schaefer <SCHAEFEJ@GUVAX.BITNET>
Date:           Friday, 25 Aug 1995 13:03:29 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 6.0640  Re: Scansion
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0640  Re: Scansion
 
Peter Groves' example from Lady Macbeth is a good one.  I'd just like to make
explicit one of his understood points:  that hypometric (short) lines are great
clues to meaning and character and character relationships.
 
When Lear challenges Cordelia,
 
                                what can you say to draw
        A third more opulent than your sisters?  Speak.
 
His command to speech is met with metric silence:
 
        Cor.    Nothing, my lord.
        Lear.   Nothing!
        Cor.    Nothing.                (I,i,89-91)
 
Six beats of silence in the first, eight in each of the others, hang in the
air.  There is no rush to argument here, but incredulity as irresistible force
meets immovable object, an actor's cue to silent but powerful reaction.
 
Later in the same scene, after Kent has repeatedly challenged Lear's rash
banishment of his daughter, the King regains control by sheer force of will:
 
                            Hear me, recreant!
        On thy allegiance, hear me!
        Since thou hast sought to make us break our vow ....
 
The three missing syllables, three silent beats, in that second line are a
demand for absolute attention by the other characters, a momentary stage
picture of their absolute, albeit defiant, obedience.
 
And yet again, when Lear is released from his madness, he tells Cordelia
 
        I am a very foolish fond old man,
        Fourscore and upward, not an hour more nor less,
        And, to deal plainly,
        I fear I am not in my perfect mind.  (IV,vii, 60-63)
 
That blank in the third line is an actor's pause; in the silence, we hear a
momentarily lucid man struggling to acknowledge his madness and sin.
 
It has been my experience that a performance that seems to be too slow is often
actually not slow enough: rushing through the text as if it were modern
psychological prose, not enough attention has been paid to the meaning of those
beats of silence that Shakespeare has written. These silences are one of the
main differences between the richness Shakespeare's art and the way that Marlow
bludgeons us with his endlessly repeating mighty line.  Silence is powerful:
like Ingmar Bergman, I've always remembered the passage from Revelations in
which the Lamb broke the seventh seal:  "there was silence in heaven about the
space of half an hour."
 
Jim Schaefer
 

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