1995

Automobile Advertisement

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0596.  Monday, 31 July 1995.
 
From:           Fiona C. Quick <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 31 Jul 95 02:08:25 CST
Subject:        Re: Automobile ad with the Bard
 
It is *not* my intention to raise any debate regarding authorship, but as an
advertising student, I found the recent campaign by an American car company
intruiging.  The advertisment begins with the question (this is not a direct
transcription, but accurate in concept) "How open minded are you?" and flashes
the litho of Bill and then asks "Would you consider that all the plays were not
written by him?" The ad goes on to describe the car company and features of the
car.
 
I found it interesting that, although the authorship topic has previously been
discussed in the mainstream, bringing it into advertising (if past cultural
influences of advertising are any indication) certainly has implications for
future discussion within American society.
 
Again, this is simply an observation, and *not* an invitation to discuss
authorship, but I would be interested to discuss *other* uses of the Bard and
his likeness within the realm of advertising and it's possible cultural
influence.
 
Fiona C. Quick
University of Minnesota
School of Journalism and Mass Communication

Q: Talbot's Size

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0595.  Monday, 31 July 1995.
 
From:           Lisa Broome <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 30 Jul 1995 18:38:05 CST6CDT
Subject:        Talbot's size in 1 Henry VI
 
Hello to everyone; this is my first message to the SHAKESPER list.
 
I'm interested in Talbot's appearance in productions of 1 Henry VI,
particularly in regards to Act Two, scene 3.  I've only seen the BBC version,
in which Talbot is average in physical stature.  Are there any performances
which include a short or diminutive Talbot? I ask in order to better understand
the Countess of Auvergne's repeated references to his appearance.  Are her
comments simply intended to anger or challenge Talbot, or is there a better way
of reading/seeing this scene? If the original actor playing Talbot (forgive me,
I haven't done my homework on the earliest production) _was_ short, it might
explain some of the scene.  Does Talbot have a (proto) "Napoleon complex" in
his daring approach to the many battles of 1 Henry VI?  Any discussion of this
play, or of the trilogy, would be welcomed, as I am currently reading them with
a reading group here in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.  Thanks, Lisa Broome

Re: "To be or not to be" Speech

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0593.  Monday, 31 July 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Robert Appelbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 29 Jul 1995 12:50:01 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0589 Re: "To be or not to be" Speech
 
(2)     From:   Paul Lord <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 29 Jul 1995 12:57:50 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: To be or not to be
 
(3)     From:   W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 30 Jul 1995 21:58:48 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0589  Re: "To be or not to be" Speech
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Appelbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 29 Jul 1995 12:50:01 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 6.0589 Re: "To be or not to be" Speech
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0589 Re: "To be or not to be" Speech
 
In response to Sean Lawrence's post, I've noticed that a new full-length study
is out on the fear of annihilation as an important motive in Elizabethan drama.
 I believe it's by Robert Watson.  Anyone read it yet, and care to comment on
it? (I know, that's cheating on my part, but what else is the 'net for?)
 
If Hamlet is giving us a kind of post-scholastic version of *esse* perhaps this
is related to the growing influence of mortalist doctrine via Calvinism?
Although a previous poster gave a very convincing account of Hamlet's Roman
Catholicism, I can't rid myself of the suspicion that on the person of Hamlet
Shakespeare has inscribed a crossing of Roman Catholicism and Calvinism, with a
few shakes of Pyrhonnism thrown in for extra body. (Sorry for the mixed
metaphor.)
 
        --Robert Appelbaum
        English- UC Berkeley
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Lord <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 29 Jul 1995 12:57:50 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Re: To be or not to be
 
Some years ago, a good friend of mine, Scott Stevens, made the following
observation about 'To be or not to be' which I must share.
 
        "Most people read it wrong.  They pause after 'mind' in the
        first line, but that can't be right.  If you pause after
        'nobler,' you end up asking 'which of these is better:'
 
                1. In the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of
                   outrageous fortune (17 syllables)
        or
                2. To take arms against a sea of troubles, and by
                   opposing end them (17 syllables)
 
        It can't be coincidence; it's Shakespeare at his cleverest,
        contrasting two phrases of equal length, one of thought,
        one of action, summing up the entire play in the middle of
        one of the central speeches.  Brilliant."
 
I haven't heard this interpretation elsewhere; is it familiar to anyone on
SHAKSPER?  I don't doubt that Scott is correct; I get an intense word-geek glee
imagining Shakespeare, chewing on his quill, trying to make the syllable counts
match.  Knowing all the while, of course, that nobody was ever going to count
them during the performance, but putting it in there anyway, just because.
 
paul
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 30 Jul 1995 21:58:48 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0589  Re: "To be or not to be" Speech
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0589  Re: "To be or not to be" Speech
 
The question is not existential. To be or not to be WHAT?  We are breaking in
(or hearing) after the thought process has begun. I think the answer to the
WHAT is found in the next line: "Whether 'tis nobler in the mind" to suffer or
to fight. To be or not to be [noble] that is the question. And which is the
nobler stance to take? Suffering or fighting?
 
What think ye?
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk

Re: Playing Videos; TV Series; Cultural Construct

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0594.  Monday, 31 July 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Paul Nelsen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 30 Jul 1995 10:36:12 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0590  Qs: Playing Shakespeare Video
 
(2)     From:   Joanne Whalen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 30 Jul 1995 19:21:02 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0590 Qs: Playing Shakespeare Videos
 
(3)     From:   William H DeRoche <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 30 Jul 1995 21:36:00 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0590; TV Shakespeare Series
 
(4)     From:   Edward Friedlander <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 30 Jul 1995 16:52:33 CST
        Subj:   Shakespeare as Cultural Construct
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Nelsen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 30 Jul 1995 10:36:12 -0500
Subject: 6.0590  Qs: Playing Shakespeare Video
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0590  Qs: Playing Shakespeare Video
 
John Barton's PLAYING SHAKESPEARE series may be purchased in standard VHS
format from Films for the Humanities, Box 2053, Princeton, NJ 08540 ( they have
a toll free phone number as well but I do not have it at hand).  Each of the
eleven tapes in the series features insightful moments that demonstrate how
actors interrogate and interpret Shakespearean text, dramtic moment, and
character.  Barton moderates the proceedings with intelligence and cuddly
charm. My students have found the tapes very engaging.  Regrettably, however,
Films for the Humanities commands a daunting price for these tapes.  The cost
really does have to be rationalized as an "investment."
 
Paul Nelsen
Marlboro College
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joanne Whalen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 30 Jul 1995 19:21:02 -0400
Subject: 6.0590 Qs: Playing Shakespeare Videos
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0590 Qs: Playing Shakespeare Videos
 
The latest brochure from *Films for the Humanities and Sciences*
(1-800-257-5126, PO Box 2053, Princeton, NJ 08543-2053) lists the entire Barton
series--11 tapes--@ $89.95 per tape or $939 for the entire series.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William H DeRoche <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 30 Jul 1995 21:36:00 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 6.0590; TV Shakespeare Series
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0590; TV Shakespeare Series
 
I have a paperback "William Shakespeare" by John Mortimer, published in 1977.
On the back it said "John Mortimer's witty, bawdy, irreverent look at the life
Shakespeare might have led while he was writing his plays - now dramatised in a
dazzling six part ATV series starring Tim Curry as William Shakespeare and
co-starring Ian McShane as Christopher Marlowe ... Jane Spencer-Turner as the
Dark Lady".  Hope this helps.  Bill DeRoche.
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edward Friedlander <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 30 Jul 1995 16:52:33 CST
Subject:        Shakespeare as Cultural Construct
 
I have been lurking for the past month and enjoying what I've read. It's great
to have an easy vehicle to remain in touch with what was once my primary focus.
 
I'm a pathologist in Kansas City, with a focus on autopsy and classroom
teaching.  I graduated magna from the Honors program in English Lit at Brown in
1973.  As a handicapped boy who liked to read, Shakespeare in particular had
been the primary interpreter, for me, of human experience.
 
And -- without apology to my postmodernist colleagues -- there IS a common
human experience, across languages and cultures.  Those of us in the sciences
laugh (or cry) at our counterparts in the humanities who would make a political
word-game of the experimental method -- the method of science which has brought
us the unparalleled good health we enjoy, as well as a host of new problems.
If Jacques Derrida is ever wrongfully injured by a physician, I will be happy
to be his expert witness and present the best scientific case to bring him
justice -- even if neither of us can really explain the relationship between
words and the world of nature.
 
But you don't have to be a scientist to be troubled by the "cultural
relativism" ideology.  Just look at the human heart.  The more I hear about
"multiculturalism", the more I see what people want, across cultural lines.
People want to be healthy, and adequately fed. People want to be loved, and to
be loved back.  People seek meaning -- even if it means believing lies to make
them feel intellectually and morally superior.  People seek an answer for
death, and Shakespeare's Hamlet is the first man to say on stage what most
people, before and after, have felt in our hearts -- confused, but with a sense
of.... After this, people want economic opportunity and security, personal
dignity and self-determination, and so forth.
 
Anybody with a heart realizes all this.  Sure, there's politics in
Shakespeare's plays, and anytime people start talking about "values". But
worldwide, over 400 years, human beings in every condition have found The Bard
to be the greatest expositor of what happens inside most people.
 
I'm no philosopher or epistemologist, but I'm not blind, either. I've heard of
the people who claim that math and physics are culture and gender-biased, and
I'm comforted by having no reason to believe they, themselves, know any math or
physics.  I'd argue that anyone who finds Shakespeare to be a mere cultural
construct knows nothing of the human heart as it really is
                            Ed Friedlander, M.D.
                            This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

2nd CFV: Newsgroup

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0592.  Monday, 31 July 1995.
 
From:           Marty Hyatt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 29 Jul 1995 14:05:48 -0400
Subject:        (fwd) 2nd CFV: humanities.lit.authors.shakespeare
 
                          LAST CALL FOR VOTES (of 2)
             unmoderated group humanities.lit.authors.shakespeare
 
***************************************************************************
* NOTE: This is the second CFV of two. If you have already voted and      *
* received an acknowledgement of your vote in email from the              *
* votetaker, you *DO* *NOT* need to vote again. If you have any           *
* questions, ask the votetaker, Michael Handler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>    *
***************************************************************************
 
Newsgroups line:
humanities.lit.authors.shakespeare      Poetry, plays, history of Shakespeare.
 
Votes must be received by 23:59:59 UTC, 2 Aug 1995.
 
This vote is being conducted by a neutral third party. For voting questions
only contact Michael Handler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>. For questions about the
proposed group contact Marty Hyatt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.
 
RATIONALE
 
Shakespeare has been discussed frequently in rec.arts.theatre.plays and
occasionally in rec.arts.books.  There is also a moderated listserv list,
SHAKSPER, devoted to Shakespeare.  But there is no Usenet newsgroup
specifically for the discussion of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. The new
group humanities.lit.authors.shakespeare will be unmoderated. There are no
plans to gate the new group to the listserv list.
 
During the first discussion period, few or no objections were raised to the
Charter itself.  Comments focused on the group's name.  As a result, the
originally proposed name (humanities.literature.english.shakespeare) was
modified to the present humanities.lit.authors.shakespeare, which was used for
the second discussion period.  During the second discussion period, there were
very few comments (and all were favorable).
 
CHARTER
 
The unmoderated newsgroup humanities.lit.authors.shakespeare will be for
discussion of:
 
1> the plays and poems of William Shakespeare and other English writers of
   the 16th and 17th centuries.
2> the life and times of Shakespeare and his contemporaries.
3> the production, staging, and acting of Shakespeare's plays, including
   current and past productions.
4> Shakespeare's influence and impact on subsequent literature and
   culture.
5> Shakespeare's authorship including his sources, allusions in his works,
   publication of his works, possible collaborations, and possible
   pseudonymity.
 
DISTRIBUTION
 
This Call For Votes (CFV) has been crossposted to the following newsgroups:
 
news.announce.newgroups, news.groups, humanities.misc,
rec.arts.books, rec.arts.theatre.plays
 
After this Call For Votes (CFV) appears in <news.announce.newsgroups>, it
will be sent to the following mailing list(s):
 
* This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
HOW TO VOTE
 
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**************************************************************************
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*** by secret ballot. If you don't like this, don't vote.              ***
**************************************************************************
 
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When in doubt, ask the votetaker.
 
humanities.lit.authors.shakespeare Bounce List - No need to revote
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
--
Michael Handler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>  Usenet Volunteer Votetakers (UVV)
Usenet Volunteer Votetakers WWW page: <URL:http://www.amdahl.com/ext/uvv>

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