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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: July ::
Re: Weimann's Locus and Platea
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0530.  Tuesday, 4 July 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Dawn Massey <
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        Date:   Monday, 03 Jul 95 16:54:49 BST
        Subj:   Re: Reply to Query locus v. platea
 
(2)     From:   David Reinheimer <
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        Date:   Monday, 3 Jul 1995 11:04:59 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0526 Re: Weimann
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dawn Massey <
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Date:           Monday, 03 Jul 95 16:54:49 BST
Subject:        Re: Reply to Query locus v. platea
 
Weimann draws the distinction between locus and platea in "Performing at the
Frontiers of Representation:  Epilogue and Post-Scriptural Future in
Shakespeare's Plays," contained in The Arts of Performance in Elizabethan and
Early Stuart Drama, Eds. Biggs, Edwards, et al.  He writes, ". . . at one
moment this stage was able to project the dramatic locality of a throne, a
tent, a house, a battlefield as some locus of textual fiction and dramatic
illusion; at another moment this locus . . . collapses into the material
reality of a neutral (nonrepresentational) platform stage in bright daylight."
These moments are foregrounded in the epilogues where the leave-taking from the
dramatic illusion seems to take place in a more open (medieval) platea like
space where the boundary between the actor and the audience is being continu-
ally negotiated, "the actor so distances the fiction of leave-taking that, on
some platea-like space, he can interrogate the representational use of the
signs of the signs of parting."
 
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Reinheimer <
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Date:           Monday, 3 Jul 1995 11:04:59 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 6.0526 Re: Weimann
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0526 Re: Weimann
 
Bill,
 
I don't have a copy of Weimann with me either, but I don't think he has his own
special definitions.  The locus and platea are ternms from fixed, ployscenic
performance of medieval cycles: the locus is another word for a mansion, and
the platea is an indeterminate playing area that surrounds the loci.
 
Have a good day!
Dave Reinheimer
UCDavis

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