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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: July ::
Re: Prospero's Children; Weimann
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0547.  Tuesday, 11 July 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Michael Swanson <
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        Date:   Monday, 10 Jul 1995 13:04:22 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Prospero's Children
 
(2)     From:   David Evett <R0870%
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        Date:   Monday, 10 Jul 1995 12:01 ET
        Subj:   Weimann
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Swanson <
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Date:           Monday, 10 Jul 1995 13:04:22 -0400
Subject:        Re: Prospero's Children
 
Some of you may be interested in the British fantasist Tad Williams's take on
Caliban, Miranda, and Propsero.  It's a novella titled "Caliban's Hour,"
available in handback from Harper, published in either 1994 or 1995. It's an
interesting version of Caliban's perspective on the events leading up to those
depicted in "The Tempest," and it depicts later events in the lives of Caliban
and Miranda as well.
 
Michael Swanson
Franklin College of Indiana
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <R0870%
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Date:           Monday, 10 Jul 1995 12:01 ET
Subject:        Weimann
 
A late, brief twist to the locus/platea thread: I've found it useful to connect
that dyad with Chaucer's of "experience" and "auctoritee." When I teach the
Wife's Prol. I wear jeans and a work shirt.  "This," I announce from a spot in
f ront of the lectern,"is 'experience.' And this"--whipping behind the lectern,
taking from it my doctoral gown, and donning it (pun! pun!)--"is 'auctorite.'"
 
I don't remember whether Weimann makes anything of the importance of the word
and concept of "locus" in traditional rhetoric, but it feeds nicely into his
scheme (pun! pun!).
 
Locally,
Dave Evett
 

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