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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: July ::
Re: *Cym.* Masque; Teaching *Lr.*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0575.  Saturday, 22 July 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Thursday, 20 Jul 1995 11:23:46 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0569 Re: *Cym.* Masque
 
(2)     From:   Victor Gallerano <
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        Date:   Friday, 21 Jul 1995 09:34:42 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Teaching *Lear*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Thursday, 20 Jul 1995 11:23:46 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 6.0569 Re: *Cym.* Masque
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0569 Re: *Cym.* Masque
 
Hello.
 
The one production I've seen of Cymbeline was a student effort at the
University of King's College in Halifax.  The space was a black area called
"the pit," underneath the chapel.
 
They had one of Posthumous's guards act the role of Jupiter and be wheeled on
in a wheelbarrow to take advantage of Posthumous's naivety. It worked fairly
well as farce.
 
Cheerio,
Sean.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Victor Gallerano <
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Date:           Friday, 21 Jul 1995 09:34:42 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Teaching *Lear*
 
John Keogh,
 
I'm not sure I can help you enjoy King Lear, but one way I have found to rouse
and awaken college freshmen to some of its beauties is to read/teach it after
reading/teaching The Tempest.  The most difficult thing for students to see is
the very surface of Lear.  Comparing the surface of the comedy to the surface
of the tragedy not only makes the surface of Lear apparent to students (who
come to class full of and all too ready to apply cliches about "disfunctional
families") but opens into the depths of a question like "What is the difference
between fathers and kings?"
 
I won't burden you with more interpretation than suggestion, but I will add
that this comparison has always been the occassion for some very good, quite
engaged student writing.
 
Vic Gallerano
 

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