1995

CFP: Post-Coloniality

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0525.  Friday, 30 June 1995.
 
From:           Martin Orkin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 30 Jun 1995 09:55:11 GMT + 2:00
Subject:        Announcement
 
ANNOUNCEMENT
 
Shakespeare - Post-coloniality - Johannesburg 1996
 
University of the Witwatersrand June 30 - July 4 1996
 
CALL FOR PAPERS
 
The original impetus for this conference emerged from a group of cultural
materialist, gay, feminist and new-historicist Shakespeare scholars who
expressed interest in the shape and direction of cultural developments in the
new South Africa. Rather than holding a narrowly-based conference at which
metropolitan scholars would speak to other metropolitan scholars, the
conference organizers are attempting to structure the event as an intellectual
exchange between continents and disciplines. The conference will begin by
exploring Shakespeare in relation to issues of post-coloniality. How do issues
of post-colonialism/anti-colonialism/multi-culturalism intersect with the
Shakespeare text? How does one approach issues of `race', resistance, `nation',
travel, empire, sexuality and gender in this context? Is the issue of a
`post-colonial' Shakespeare the same in different geographical locations? We
envisage these concerns opening up into a consideration of Shakespeare within
the broader framework of English Literary Studies, Education, Performance;
their academic and social legacies and questions of local and global
knowledges. We hope that these papers will pave the way for a critical
engagement with certain tenets of post-colonial theory. We also hope that an
important strand of the conference will focus on performance.
 
Please send abstracts for twenty-minute papers (by 30 September 1995 at the
very latest)  and any enquiries to
 
Martin Orkin
Conference Co-ordinator
Africa/Shakespeare Committee
University of the Witwatersrand
Private Bag 3
PO Wits
2050 South Africa
 
Fax: 011 403 7309
e-mail:   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
 
Thanks Hardy, for your help
Best wishes
Martin Orkin

Re: *Prospero's Books* with Editor's Note

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0524.  Friday, 30 June 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Douglas Flummer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 Jun 95  20:04:56 CST
        Subj:   SHK 6.0522  Qs: *Prospero's Books*
 
(2)     From:   G.L. Horton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 30 Jun 1995 09:46:25 +0059 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0522 Qs: *Prospero's Books*
 
 
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From:           Douglas Flummer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Jun 95  20:04:56 CST
Subject: Qs: *Prospero's Books*
Comment:        SHK 6.0522  Qs: *Prospero's Books*
 
Greenaway (that is the correct spelling, I now remember) used many of the same
aesthetics in doing "Prospero's Books" that Stacy quotes him on.  One that I
found particularly touching was his use of music throughout both films.  He
used similar avant guarde classical themesthat focused on wordless vocal, I
believe sung by a young male soprano.  He paced the films so that the plot
moved rather quickly (I had to work to keep up with it).  It has been several
years since I have seen either film, so my memory fades a bit, but I would call
Greenaway's adaption to be a rather interesting interpretation that calls for
as much imagination on the part of the viewer as there is on film for the most
enjoyment.  I would expect that if a person does not care for the avant guarde,
then it might be difficult to enjoy.  But I do, and I did, so I recommend it
highly.
 
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From:           G.L. Horton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 30 Jun 1995 09:46:25 +0059 (EDT)
Subject: 6.0522 Qs: *Prospero's Books*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0522 Qs: *Prospero's Books*
 
Prospero's Books is available on video.  It is well worth seeing if you are in
the right mood --when I saw it, none of my companions was willing to put up
with the stream-of-consciousness imagery, even given the plethora of gorgeous
bodies: the most patient of them last half an hour, and only I stuck it out to
the end.  The perversities  -- Gielgud reciting Miranda's lines while a naked
satyr child swing back and forth on a trapeze, urinating into the swimming pool
 -- quickly become tiresome, but frame by fame the film is almost unimaginably
beautiful
 
G.L. Horton
 
[Editor's Note: *Prospero's Books* has been discussed several times in the past
on SHAKSPER.  Anyone interested in reeading them can located them with the
DATABASE Function.  --HMC]

Qs: Jesuit Quotation; *Prospero's Books*; Weimann

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0522.  Thursday, 29 June 1995.
 
(1)     From:   David Wilson-Okamura <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 28 Jun 95 17:16:12 CDT
        Subj:   Shakespeare's reading
 
(2)     From:   Stacy Mulder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 28 Jun 1995 12:37:19 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0521  *Tmp.* Allusion
 
(3)     From:   David Schalkwyk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 Jun 1995 14:20:12 SAST-2
        Subj:   Re: Weimann: locus and platea
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Wilson-Okamura <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 28 Jun 95 17:16:12 CDT
Subject:        Shakespeare's reading
 
I really don't have any reason to believe that Shakespeare read this book, but
it's summer and I will therefore beg your indulgence. . .
 
I am looking for a book written by a contemporary of Machiavelli, a Jesuit, the
subject of which is something like "how to live a good life in an evil world."
Has anyone heard of such a volume--either the title or the author? If you have,
I'd be very grateful if you dropped me a (private) note at
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
 
                                Yours faithfully,
                                David Wilson-Okamura
                                This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
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From:           Stacy Mulder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 28 Jun 1995 12:37:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0521  *Tmp.* Allusion
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0521  *Tmp.* Allusion
 
I found it interesting that Douglas Flummer referred to Peter Greenway's "Cook,
Thief" in speaking of "Prospero's Books," etc. Greenway IS indeed a very
controversial director but a very good one (and I think the spelling is perhaps
Greenaway, though I have myself misstyped it now twice). In an article by
Karrie Jacobs ("For Peter Greenaway, Movies are a Dutch Treat." _NYT_ 21 Apr.
1991), Greenaway speaks of his aesthetics in "Cook, Thief": I believe
Greenaway's debt to MND is obvious:
 
"You have the cold exterior of the car park, which is blue. It's the nether
regions where the dogs howl at night.  There is the green kitchen, which
represents the omnipotent jungle from where all the food comes.  There is the
carnivorous, violent red dining room where all the aggression occurs. The
toilets, which are blindingly white, where the lovers met for the first time,
could indicate heaven."
 
I am not familiar with "Prospero's Books," but I would like to be. I am
interested to see what Greenaway has done with it.
 
Stacy Mulder
Ball State University
Muncie, Indiana
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
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From:           David Schalkwyk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Jun 1995 14:20:12 SAST-2
Subject:        Re: Weimann: locus and platea
 
Could anyone help with the following question?  Whereas I have heard vague
charges that Weimann's work on representation and the popular tradition of the
Elizabethan theatre, his distinction between the locus and platea in
particular, is "outdated", "overstated", or just plain wrong, I know of no
sustained critique of this aspect of his work.  Does anyone know of any, and if
so, could you let me have the references?   Thanks.   I can be contacted
directly at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
DAVID SCHALKWYK

Re: Weimann; Parts; STC On-Line

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0523.  Friday, 30 June 1995.
 
(1)     From:   John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 Jun 1995 10:28:55 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0522  Qs: Weimann
 
(2)     From:   W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday|, 29 Jun 1995 15:55:28 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0519  Re: Shakespeare's Parts;
 
(3)     From:   W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 Jun 1995 16:35:19 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0517  Re: On-line STC
 
 
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From:           John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Jun 1995 10:28:55 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0522  Qs: Weimann
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0522  Qs: Weimann
 
The best "sustained critique" of Weimann's argument is Hans Jurgen Diller's
*The Middle English Mystery Play:  A Study in Dramatic Speech and Form* trans.
Frances Wessels (Cambridge, 1992).  I don't remember if Diller addresses the
distinction between locus and platea in particular.  I too would be interested
to know of other sustained critiques of Weimann, par- ticularly the argument
that David Schalwyk mentions.  Please reply via the network, in case others are
interested.
 
John Cox
Hope College
 
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From:           W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday|, 29 Jun 1995 15:55:28 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0519  Re: Shakespeare's Parts;
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0519  Re: Shakespeare's Parts;
 
Melissa Aaron asks about the parts Shakespeare played. Schoenbaum discusses the
evidence in <i>William Shakespeare: A Compact Life</i> and seems skeptical.
Shakespeare was supposed to have played Adam in <i>As You Like It</i> and
Hamlet's Ghost: "characters with one or both feet in the grave" (202).
Schoenbaum's skepticism nothwithstanding, Don Foster's research with SHAXICON
seems to support the idea that Shakespeare played the roles of old or older men
like Escalus, minor roles rather than major roles.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Jun 1995 16:35:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0517  Re: On-line STC
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0517  Re: On-line STC
 
Our English bibliographer, Rosemary Franklin, advises writing or calling the
Research Library Group for information about the STC online. I came up with
the following addresses: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; and
the following telephone number: 800-537-7546.
 
I hope this information helps.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk

Re: Shakespeare's Parts; Word Games in *Sonnets*

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0519.  Tuesday, 27 June 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Melissa Aaron <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 26 Jun 1995 19:25:03 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0515 Q: The Parts Shakespeare Played
 
(2)     From:   W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 26 Jun 1995 20:38:04 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0510  Q: Word Games in the *Sonnets*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Melissa Aaron <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 26 Jun 1995 19:25:03 +0200
Subject: 6.0515 Q: The Parts Shakespeare Played
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0515 Q: The Parts Shakespeare Played
 
Actually, if no one else minds, I'd like to see some of the replies to this.  I
read somewhere that Shakespeare specialized in kingly roles, but don't know any
details.
 
Melissa Aaron
University of Wisconsin-Madison
 
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From:           W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 26 Jun 1995 20:38:04 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0510  Q: Word Games in the *Sonnets*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0510  Q: Word Games in the *Sonnets*
 
Many years ago, I noticed a play on I/eye in Sonnet 149, lines 1, 2, 3, 5,
6, 7, 9, 12. See Stephen Booth's edition of the Sonnets (2nd ed.)  for more
information about Shakespeare's "super-subtle exercise on I and eye" (583).
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk

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