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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: June ::
Illinois Fest.; Fonts; Recordings; Directing; Tillyard
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0440.  Friday, 2 June 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Pete Guither <
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        Date:   Thursday, 01 Jun 1995 11:33:27 CST
        Subj:   Il Shakes Fest URL
 
(2)     From:   John Owen <
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        Date:   Thursday, 1 Jun 1995 10:28:46 -0700
        Subj:   Caedmon and Argo
 
(3)     From:   Thomas G. Bishop <
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        Date:   Thursday, 1 Jun 1995 18:32:27 -0400
        Subj:   Re; Directing in the Elizabethan Theater
 
(4)     From:   Jesus Cora <
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        Date:   Friday,  2 Jun 1995 15:51:33 UTC+0200
        Subj:   SHK 6.0392  Re: Tillyard
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Pete Guither <
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Date:           Thursday, 01 Jun 1995 11:33:27 CST
Subject:        Il Shakes Fest URL
 
Info on Illinois Shakespeare Festival 1995 season, new URL address, articles
available, and coming Shakespeare font.
 
The Illinois Shakespeare Festival just got on the web yesterday with a set of
pages which includes information on the Festival and this year's season, plus a
series of articles originally written for our program guides which might be of
interest.  Included are articles on *R&J*, *RII*, *1HIV*, *MND*, a production
of *Pericles* with a deaf actor in the title role and the sign language he
developed for the role, and others.  The URL is:
 
http://orathost.cfa.ilstu.edu/isf.html
 
The 95 season runs June 30 through August 6 and includes *2HIV* (as a
continuation of the history series -- one each year, with a lecture series on
the history and culture of the time), *Cymbeline* (The most common reaction
from our patrons has been "Oh?  Who is THAT by?"), and *Comedy*.  Since there
has been some discussion on the Karamozov *Comedy* here recently, I thought you
might be interested to know that director Steve Rothman is approaching *Comedy*
in the concept of "How 1940's Hollywood viewed America" (I believe we may have
the Marx Brothers in it).
 
Someone earlier was looking for a Shakespearean font.  We are working on
developing a font based on the folio.  It's almost complete (just a matter of
my finding time to add punctuation and an alternate "s" while getting our
season up and running).  We will be making it available free at our web site a
little later this summer.
 
Please let me know if you would like more info on our season, web pages, or the
font.
 
Peter Guither, General Manager
Illinois Shakespeare Festival

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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Owen <
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Date:           Thursday, 1 Jun 1995 10:28:46 -0700
Subject:        Caedmon and Argo
 
Do not depend on the availability of the Caedmon collection unless it has been
reissued by Harper Audio under their label. Many of the recordings are only
available until the stock purchased by the publisher at the time of acquisition
dries up (conjecture on my part). I experienced this with a number of
non-Shakespearean recordings, and fairly popular ones at that. I'll believe in
the availability of the whole SRS series when someone tells me they bought
Titus Andronicus during the last year. (BTW, this too is excellent, with
Michael Hordern a terrific Titus).
 
Regarding the Argo recordings, officially by the members of the Marlowe
Dramatic Society of Cambridge, they are an interesting series for a number of
reasons. First, they have travelled quite a bit, and I have seen them under not
only the Argo label, but under Decca, London and Newman as well. Second, the
quality is wildly uneven. The Society is made up of amateurs with occasional
appearances by notable professionals. Thus, a truly amateur production of the
two parts of Henry IV moves along at a mediocre clip until part one, I iii,
when out of the blue comes Paul Scofield as Hotspur!!! So you get the Katherina
Minola of Peggy Ashcroft, the scary Margaret of Anjou of Mary Morris, Michael
Hordern's wonderful Prospero and Irene Worth's Cleopatra plonked in the middle
of university level performances (some surprisingly good, e.g. young Derek
Jacobi and Ian McKellen). Nevertheless, I would like to know where David Levine
is getting them. God knows I have had little luck save in libraries.
 
John Owen
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas G. Bishop <
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Date:           Thursday, 1 Jun 1995 18:32:27 -0400
Subject:        Re; Directing in the Elizabethan Theater
 
Stephen Orgel's note about "directorship" in the masque (is there any specific
indication that it was Jones who was responsible, or might it have been one of
the dancing-masters?) is very much relevant to this discussion, since in the
masque many of the performers were amateurs and could _not_ be expected to have
the sort of developed knowledge of staging that a professional company would
have. Though the Witches were presumably professionals, as I recall, those
binding them were not. (Again, I dont have a text to hand).
 
Tom Bishop
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jesus Cora <
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Date:           Friday,  2 Jun 1995 15:51:33 UTC+0200
Subject: Re: Tillyard
Comment:        SHK 6.0392  Re: Tillyard
 
Dear SHAKESPEReans,
 
I have been going through my accumulated e-mail and the discussions on
Tylliard's books have drawn my attention powerfully. I am working on the
evolution of the induction convention and I take the Elizabethan world-view and
its collapse as the basis to establish the factors that influenced this
evolution. I do not think that Tylliard is dated or, for that matter, that his
theories are not tenable anymore. I am sure that some Elizabethan and Jacobean
authors worried over the possibility of this order being lost, and some others
rejoiced at the idea and sought to undermine it in their writings as Dollimore
aptly pointed out. I do not see Tylliard and Dollimore as incompatible, but
complementary. In any case, whether the world view is accepted or rejected in
texts, *it is there* and we must bear it in mind in order to understand the
texts and the point of view of their creators. May I also point to the fact
that our world view is also changing very fast and this changing is producing
conflicts too? Do not we find thar there is as New World (Dis)order after the
Fall of the Wall? I do not know much about the Theory of Chaos, but is it not
changing many of the assumptions held by scientists? Do not many people feel
nostalgia for the Old Order of Political Blocks? Why is there such an obsession
with the occult and religion nowadays? Why are angels so fashionable now? (If
my memory serves me right, Thomas Middleton wrote a treatise on angels in the
1620s) Why is religious bigotry thriving in many societies -the Puritans strike
back-? I think that we are undergoing a process of change similar to that of
1590-1650. Can we consider this contemporary period the Neobaroque?
 
I am looking forward to reading your reflections.
 
Meditatingly and mediatingly yours,
Jesus CORA ALONSO
Universidad de Alcala de Henares.
 

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