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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: June ::
Re: Field; Library; Biography (THE LAST WORD)
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0513.  Monday, 26 June 1995.
 
(1)     From:   David Kathman<
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        Date:   Sunday, 25 Jun 1995 20:55:13 +0100
        Subj:   Shakespeare's library
 
(2)     From:   W.L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Sunday, 25 Jun 1995 22:28:24 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0511  Richard Field; Shakespeare's Library;
 
(3)     From:   Stephanie Hughes <
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        Date:   Monday, 26 Jun 1995 00:42:00 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: Shakespeare the Businessman
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Kathman<
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Date:           Sunday, 25 Jun 1995 20:55:13 +0100
Subject:        Shakespeare's library
 
In response to Bob Leslie's query for sources on Richard Field, I have just a
few additions to Hardy's suggested readings:
 
Stopes, Charlotte Carmichael. *The Bacon-Shakespeare Question Answered*.
     London, 1889. [In an appendix she lists some of the more interesting
     books Field published, including North's Plutarch, Harington's
     Orlando Furioso, Ovid's Metamorphoses, many books on Italy and France
     including English translations of an Italian grammar and a history
     of Italy, etc. etc.]
 
Stopes, Charlotte Carmichael. *Shakespeare's Warwickshire Contemporaries*.
     Stratford-on-Avon, 1907.  [Has a pretty complete biography of Field,
     including a more complete list of the books he printed.]
 
Eccles, Mark. *Shakespeare in Warwickshire*. Madison, University of Wisconsin
     Press, 1961. pp. 59-60.  [A compact but informative biographical
     sketch of Field, as part of a section on the Stratford boys born within
     a few years of Shakespeare, who we can assume were his schoolmates.]
 
As for the second question, the standard reference for the sources Shakespeare
used is Geoffrey Bullough's *Narrative and Dramatic Sources of Shakespeare*,
which lists and excerpts certain, probable, and possible sources for the plays
and poems, as well as literary parallels.
 
Dave Kathman

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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W.L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Sunday, 25 Jun 1995 22:28:24 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0511  Richard Field; Shakespeare's Library;
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0511  Richard Field; Shakespeare's Library;
 
Books published by Richard Field can be found in the index of the second
edition of the Pollard and Redgrave Short Title Catalogue, or, if you have
access to the STC on line, you can request a complete list to download.
 
Regarding Shakespeare's reading, there is an older book by Anders called
<i>Shakespeare's Reading</i> -- if my memory serves me correctly.  And, as I
recall, it wasn't very helpful. You might try Geoffrey Bullough's <i>Narrative
and Dramatic Sources of Shakespeare</i> and Kenneth Muir's <i>The Sources of
Shakespeare's Plays</i>.  Also you might look at the footnotes of the first and
second Arden editions. (Forget Arden three if you're interested in scholarship.
It's definitely theatre-oriented.)
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <
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Date:           Monday, 26 Jun 1995 00:42:00 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Re: Shakespeare the Businessman
 
Thomas Dale Keever;
 
Your choice of comparisons seems poor. Certainly neither Byron nor Dickens
would have hoarded grain in time of famine. (Dylan? Amis? Which ones?) The
Kaufman anecdote is unfortunate as well. Apart from Kaufman's being a very
different sort of writer than the author of the Shakespeare canon, and the
anecdote being what it is, an anecdote, clearly meant to amuse, so that one
can't help but question its literal truth (while the accusations of grain
hoarding are a matter of record), Kaufman was certainly within his moral rights
to insist on protecting his work. Shakespeare of Stratford, on the other hand,
appears to have allowed just about anyone to publish his work without giving
him any credit for it. Odd behavior for an astute businessman. Nor does the
unkindness of refusing to allow a poor acting company to use one's material for
free compare in any way, morally or businesswise, with hoarding grain in time
of famine.
 
You may have a better example. If so you may want to save it for the new usenet
group opening up in late July where questions of authorship will be acceptable.
I promised to keep quiet, and to wait until the flak died down, but the
condescending tone of your post required some response. I look forward to
continuing the discussion in late July.
 
Stephanie Hughes (not Hill)
 

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