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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: June ::
Qs: Jesuit Quotation; *Prospero's Books*; Weimann
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0522.  Thursday, 29 June 1995.
 
(1)     From:   David Wilson-Okamura <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 28 Jun 95 17:16:12 CDT
        Subj:   Shakespeare's reading
 
(2)     From:   Stacy Mulder <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 28 Jun 1995 12:37:19 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0521  *Tmp.* Allusion
 
(3)     From:   David Schalkwyk <
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        Date:   Thursday, 29 Jun 1995 14:20:12 SAST-2
        Subj:   Re: Weimann: locus and platea
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Wilson-Okamura <
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Date:           Wednesday, 28 Jun 95 17:16:12 CDT
Subject:        Shakespeare's reading
 
I really don't have any reason to believe that Shakespeare read this book, but
it's summer and I will therefore beg your indulgence. . .
 
I am looking for a book written by a contemporary of Machiavelli, a Jesuit, the
subject of which is something like "how to live a good life in an evil world."
Has anyone heard of such a volume--either the title or the author? If you have,
I'd be very grateful if you dropped me a (private) note at

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 .
 
                                Yours faithfully,
                                David Wilson-Okamura
                                
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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stacy Mulder <
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 >
Date:           Wednesday, 28 Jun 1995 12:37:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0521  *Tmp.* Allusion
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0521  *Tmp.* Allusion
 
I found it interesting that Douglas Flummer referred to Peter Greenway's "Cook,
Thief" in speaking of "Prospero's Books," etc. Greenway IS indeed a very
controversial director but a very good one (and I think the spelling is perhaps
Greenaway, though I have myself misstyped it now twice). In an article by
Karrie Jacobs ("For Peter Greenaway, Movies are a Dutch Treat." _NYT_ 21 Apr.
1991), Greenaway speaks of his aesthetics in "Cook, Thief": I believe
Greenaway's debt to MND is obvious:
 
"You have the cold exterior of the car park, which is blue. It's the nether
regions where the dogs howl at night.  There is the green kitchen, which
represents the omnipotent jungle from where all the food comes.  There is the
carnivorous, violent red dining room where all the aggression occurs. The
toilets, which are blindingly white, where the lovers met for the first time,
could indicate heaven."
 
I am not familiar with "Prospero's Books," but I would like to be. I am
interested to see what Greenaway has done with it.
 
Stacy Mulder
Ball State University
Muncie, Indiana

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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Schalkwyk <
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Date:           Thursday, 29 Jun 1995 14:20:12 SAST-2
Subject:        Re: Weimann: locus and platea
 
Could anyone help with the following question?  Whereas I have heard vague
charges that Weimann's work on representation and the popular tradition of the
Elizabethan theatre, his distinction between the locus and platea in
particular, is "outdated", "overstated", or just plain wrong, I know of no
sustained critique of this aspect of his work.  Does anyone know of any, and if
so, could you let me have the references?   Thanks.   I can be contacted
directly at 
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DAVID SCHALKWYK
 

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